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Historic Preservation - Technical Procedures

Spectitle:

The Americans With Disabilities Act: Checklist For Readily Achievable Barrier Removal

Procedure code:

0110010S

Source:

Accessibility And Historic Preservation Resource Guide

Division:

General Requirements

Section:

Special Project Procedures

Last Modified:

02/24/2012

Details:

The Americans With Disabilities Act: Checklist For Readily Achievable Barrier Removal



THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT:  CHECKLIST FOR READILY
ACHIEVABLE BARRIER REMOVAL


(Reprinted with permission by the Southeast Regional Disability and
Business Technical Assistance Center)

For more information on accessibility and preservation concerns,
see 01060-03-S, 01100-09-S, 01100-11-S and 01091-04-S thru 01091-19-S; For guidance on
developing an accessibility plan, see 01060-05-S.


***INTRODUCTION***

Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act requires public
accommodations to provide goods and services to people with
disabilities on an equal basis with the rest of the general public.
The goal is to afford every individual the opportunity to benefit
from our country's businesses and services the opportunity to
benefit from the patronage of all Americans.

By January 26, 1992, architectural and communication barriers must
be removed in public areas of existing facilities when their
removal is readily achievable-in other words, easily accomplished
and able to be carried out without much difficulty or expense.
Public accommodations that must meet the barrier removal
requirement include a broad range of establishments (both for-profit and nonprofit)-such as
hotels, restaurants, theaters,
museums, retail stores, private schools banks, doctors' offices,
and other places that serve the public. People who own, lease,
lease out, or operate places of public accommodation in existing
building are responsible for complying with the barrier removal
requirement.

The removal of barriers can often be achieved by making simple
changes to the physical environment.  However, the regulations do
not define exactly how much effort and expense are required for a
facility to meet its obligation. This judgement must be made on a
case-by-case basis, taking into consideration such factors as the
size, type and overall financial resources of the facility, and the
nature and cost of the access improvements needed. These factors
are described in the ADA regulations issued by the Department of
Justice.

The process of determining what changes are readily achievable is
not a one-time effort; access should be re-evaluated annually.
Barrier removal that might be difficulat to carry out now may be
readily achievable later.  Tax incentives are available to help
absorb costs over several years.


***PURPOSE OF THIS CHECKLIST***

This checklist will help you identify accessibility problems and
solutions in existing facilities in order to meet your obligations
under the ADA.

The goal of the survey process is to plan how to make an existing
facility more usable for people with disabilities. The Department
of Justice recommends the development of an Implementation Plan,
specifying what improvements you will make to remove barriers and
when each solution will be carried out: "...Such a plan...could
serve as evidence of a good faith effort to comply..."


***TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS***

This checklist details some of the requirements found in the ADA
Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG). However, keep in mind that full
compliance with ADAAG is required only for new construction and
alterations.  The requirements are presented here as a guide to
help you determine what may be readily achievable barrier removal
for existing facilities. Whenever possible, ADAAG should be used in
making readily achievable modifications. If complying with ADAAG is
not readily achievable, you may undertake a modification that does
not fully comply with ADAAG using less stringent standards, as long
as it poses no health or safety risk.

Each state has its own regulations regarding accessibility. To
ensure compliance with all codes, know your state and local codes
and use the more stringent technical requirement that provides
greater access for individuals with disabilities. The barrier
removal requirement for existing facilities is new under the ADA
and supersedes less stringent local or state codes.


***WHAT THIS CHECKLIST IS NOT***

This checklist does not cover all of ADAAG's requirements;
therefore, it is not for facilities undergoing new construction or
alterations. In addition, it does not attempt to illustrate all
possible barriers or propose all possible barrier removal
solutions.  ADAAG should be consulted for guidance in situations
not covered here.

The checklist does not cover Title II's requirements for non
discriminatory policies and practices and practices and for the
provision of auxiliary communication aids and services.  the
communication features covered are those that are structural in
nature.


***PRIORITIES***

This checklist is based on the four priorities recommended by the
Title III regulations for planning readily achievable barrier
removal projects:

-    Priority 1:  Accessible ENTRANCE into the facility

-    Priority 2:  Access to GOODS AND SERVICES

-    Priority 3:  Access to RESTROOMS

-    Priority 4:  Any OTHER MEASURES necessary


***HOW TO USE THIS CHECKLIST***

1.   Get Organized:  

    Establish a time frame for completing the survey. Determine<= br>     how many copies of the checklist you will need to survey the
    whole facility,  decide who will conduct the survey. It is
    strongly recommended that you invite two or three additional=
    people, including people with various disabilities and
    accessibility expertise, to assist in identifying barriers,<= br>     and setting priorities for implementing improvements.

2.   Obtain Floor Plans:  

    It is very helpful to have the building floor plans with you
    while you survey. If plans are not available, use graph paper
    to sketch the layout of all interior and exterior spaces used
    by your organization. Make notes on the sketch or plan while=
    you are surveying.

3.   Conduct the Survey:  

    Bring copies of this checklist, a clipboard, a pencil or pen,
    and a flexible steel tape measure.  With three people     surveying, one person numbers key items on the floor plan to
    match with the field notes, taken by a second person, while<= br>     the third takes measurements. Think about each space from the
    perspective of people with physical, hearing, visual, and
    cognitive disabilities, noting areas that need improvement.<= br>
4.   Summarize Barriers and Solutions:  

    List barriers found and ideas for their removal. Consider the
    solutions listed beside each question, and add your own ideas.
    Consult with building contractors and equipment suppliers to
    estimate the costs for making the proposed modifications.

5.   Make Decisions and Set Priorities:  

    Review the summary with decision makers and advisors. Decide=
    which solutions will best eliminate barriers at a reasonable=
    cost. Prioritize the items you decide upon and make a timeli= ne
    for carrying them out. Where the removal of barriers is not
    readily achievable, you must consider whether there are
    alternative methods for providing access that are readily
    achievable.

6.   Maintain Documentation:  

    Keep your survey, notes, summary, record of work completed,<= br>     and plans for alternative methods on file.

7.   Make Changes:  

    Implement changes as planned. Always refer directly to ADAAG=
    and your state and local codes for complete technical
    requirements before making any access improvement. Reference= s
    to the applicable sections of ADAAG are listed at the
    beginning of each group of questions. If you need help
    understanding the federal, state or local requirements,
    contact your Disability and Business Technical Assistance
    Center.

8.   Follow Up:  

    Review your Implementation Plan each year to re-evaluate
    whether more improvements have become readily achievable.


***PRIORITY 1:  ACCESSIBLE ENTRANCE***

People with disabilities should be able to arrive on the site,
approach the building, and enter the building as freely as everyone
else.  At least one path of travel should be safe and accessible
for everyone, including people with disabilities.

If the answer to any of the following questions is NO, then refer
to the possible solutions listed below each question.


PATH OF TRAVEL (ADAAG 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.7):

1.   Is there a path of travel that does not require the use of
    stairs?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add a ramp if the path of travel is interrupt= ed by
         stairs.

    -    Add an alternative pathway on level ground.
2.   Is the path of travel stable, firm and slip-resistant?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Repair uneven paving.

    -    Fill small bumps and breaks with beveled patches.

    -    Replace gravel with hard top.

3.   Is the path at least 36 inches wide?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:
   
    -    Change or move landscaping, furnishings, or other
         features that narrow the path of travel.=

    -    Widen pathway.

4.   Can all objects protruding into the path be detected by a
    person with a visual disability using a cane?

    NOTE:  In order to be detected using a cane, an object must be
    within 27 inches of the ground.  Objects hanging or mounted
    overhead must be higher than 80 inches to provide clear head
    room.  It is not necessary to remove objects that protr= ude
    less than 4 inches from the wall.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Move or remove protruding objects.

    -    Add a cane-detectable base that extends to the ground.

    -    Place a cane-detectable object on the ground underneath
         as a warning barrier.

5.   Do curbs on the pathway have curb cuts at drives, parking, and
    drop-offs?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install curb cut.

    -    Add small ramp up to curb.


RAMPS (ADAAG 4.8):

1.   Are the slopes of ramps no greater than 1:12?

    NOTE:  Slope is given as a ratio of the height to the length.
    1:12 means for every 12 inches along the base of the ramp, the
    height increases one inch.  For a 1:12 maximum slope, at least
    one foot of ramp length is needed for each inch of height.
    Yes  No


    Possible Solutions:

    -    Lengthen ramp to decrease slope.

    -    Relocate ramp.

    -    If available space is limited, reconfigure ramp to
         include switchbacks.

2.   Do all ramps longer than 6 feet have railings on both sides?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add railings.

3.   Are railings sturdy, and between 34 and 38 inches high?


    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Adjust height of railings.

    -    Secure handrails.

4.   Is the width between railings at least 36 inches?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Relocate the railings.

              -    Widen the ramp.=0C5.   Are ramps non-slip?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add non-slip surface material.

6.   Is there a 5-foot-long level landing at every 30-foot
    horizontal length of ramp, at the top and bottom of ramps and
    at switchbacks?

    NOTE:  The ramp should rise no more than 30 inches between
    landings.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Remodel or relocate ramp.


PARKING AND DROP-OFF AREAS (ADAAG 4.6):

1.   Are an adequate number of accessible parking spaces available
    (8 feet wide for car plus 5-foot striped access aisle)?  

    NOTE:  For guidance in determining the appropriate number to
    designate, the table below gives the ADAAG requirements for
    new construction and alterations (for lots with more than 100
    spaces, refer to ADAAG).

    Total Spaces        Accessible

    1 to 25             1 space
    26 to 50            2 spaces     51 to 75            3 spaces     76 to 100           4 spaces

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Reconfigure a reasonable number of spaces by repainting
         stripes.

2.   Are 16-foot-wide spaces, with 98 inches of vertical clearance,
    available for lift-equipped vans?

    NOTE:  At least one of every 8 accessible spaces must be van-accessible.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Reconfigure to provide a reasonable number of van-accessible spaces.

3.   Are the accessible spaces closest to the accessible entrance?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Reconfigure spaces.

4.   Are accessible spaces marked with the International Symbol of
    Accessibility?  Are there signs reading "Van Acces= sible" at
    van spaces?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add signs, placed so that they are not obstru= cted by
         cars.

5.   Is there an enforcement procedure to ensure that accessible
    parking is used only by those who need it?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Implement a policy to check periodically for violators
         and report them to the proper authoritie= s.


ENTRANCE (ADAAG 4.13, 4.14):

1.   If there are stairs at the main entrance, is there also a ramp
    or lift, or is there an alternative accessible entrance?

    NOTE:  Do not use a service entrance as the accessible<= br>     entrance unless there is no other option.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    If it not possible to make the main entrance accessible,
         create a dignified alternate accessible entrance.  Make
         sure there is accessible parking near accessible
         entrances.

2.   Do all inaccessible entrances have signs indicating the
    location of the nearest accessible entrance?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install signs at or before inaccessible entra= nces.

3.   Can the alternate accessible entrance be used independently?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Eliminate as much as possible the need for assistance -
         to answer the doorbell, to operate a lift, or to put down
         a temporary ramp, for example.

4.   Does the entrance door have at least 32 inches clear opening
    (for a double door, at least one 32-inch leaf)?

    NOTE:  A person using a wheelchair needs this space to get
    close enough to open the door.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Widen the door.

    -    Install offset (swing-clear) hinges.

5.   Is there at least 18 inches of clear wall space on the pull
    side of the door, next to the handle?

    NOTE:  A person using a wheelchair needs this space to get
    close enough to open the door.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Remove or relocate furnishings, partitions, or other
         obstructions.

    -    Move door.

    -    Add power-assisted door opener.

6.   Is the threshold level (less than 1/4 inch) or beveled, up to
    1/2 inch high?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    If there is a single step with a rise of 6 inches or
         less, add a short ramp.

    -    If there is a threshold, remove it or add a bevel.

7.   Are doormats 1/2 inch high or less, and secured to the floor
    at all edges?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Replace or remove mats.

    -    Secure mats at edges.

8.   Is the door handle no higher than 48 inches and operable with
    a closed fist?

    NOTE:  The "closed fist" test for handles and controls:  Try
    opening the door or operating the control using only one hand,
    held in a fist.  If you can do it, so can a person who has
    limited use of his or her hands.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Replace inaccessible knob with a lever or loop handle.

    -    Retrofit with an add-on lever extension.

9.   Can doors be opened without too much force (maximum is 5 lbf)?

    NOTE:  You can use a fish scale to measure the force required
    to open a door.  Attach the hook of the scale to the doorknob
    or handle.  Pull on the ring end of the scale until the door
    opens, and read off the amount of force required.  If you do
    not have a fish scale, you will need to judge subjectively     whether the door is easy enough to open.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Adjust the door closers and oil the hinges.
    -    Install power-assisted door openers.

    -    Install lighter doors.

10.  If the door has a closer, does it take at least 3 seconds to
    close?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Adjust door closer.


EMERGENCY EGRESS (ADAAG 4.1.3 (14), 4.28):

1.   Do all alarms have both flashing lights and audible signals?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install visible and audible alarms.

2.   Is there sufficient lighting in egress pathways such as
    stairs, corridors, and exits?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Upgrade, add, or clean bulbs or fixtures.


***PRIORITY 2:  ACCESS TO GOODS AND SERVICES***

Ideally, the layout of the building should allow people with
disabilities to obtain goods or services without special
assistance.  Where it is not possible to provide full
accessibility, assistance or alternative services should be
available upon request.


HORIZONTAL CIRCULATION (ADAAG 4.3):

1.   Does the accessible entrance provide direct access to the main
    floor, lobby, or elevator?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add ramps or lifts.

    -    Make another entrance accessible.

2.   Are all public spaces on an accessible path of travel?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Provide access to all public spaces along an accessible
         path of travel.

3.   Is the accessible route to all public spaces at least 36
    inches wide?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Move furnishings such as tables, chairs, display racks,
         vending machines, and counters to make more room.

4.   Is there a 5-foot circle or a T-shaped space for a person
    using a wheelchair to reverse direction?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Rearrange furnishings, displays and equipment= .


DOORS (ADAAG 4.13):

1.   Do doors into public spaces have at least a 32-inch clear
    opening?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install offset (swing-clear) hinges.

    -    Widen doors.

2.   On the pull side of doors, next to the handle, is there at
    least 18 inches of clear wall space so that a person using a
    wheelchair can get near to open the door?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Reverse the door swing if it is safe to do so.

    -    Move or remove obstructing partitions.

3.   Can doors be opened without too much force (5 lbf maximum)?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Adjust or replace closers.

    -    Install lighter doors.

    -    Install power-assisted door openers.

4.   Are door handles 48 inches high or less and operable with a
    closed fist?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Lower handles.

    -    Replace inaccessible knobs or latches with lever or loop
         handles.

    -    Retrofit with add-on lever extensions.

    -    Install power-assisted door openers.

5.   Are all thresholds level (less than 1/4 inch), or beveled, up
    to 1/2 inch high?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Remove thresholds.

    -    Add bevels to both sides.


ROOMS AND SPACES (ADAAG 4.2, 4.4, 4.5, 4.30):

1.   Are all aisles and pathways to all goods and services at least
    36 inches wide?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Rearrange furnishings and fixtures to clear aisles.

2.   Is there a 5-foot circle or T-shaped space for turning a
    wheelchair completely?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Rearrange furnishings to clear more room.

3.   Is carpeting low-pile, tightly woven, and securely attached
    along edges?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Secure edges on all sides.

    -    Replace carpeting.

4.   In routes through public areas, are all obstacles cane-
    detectable (located within 27 inches of the floor or
    protruding less than 4 inches from the wall), or are they
    higher than 80 inches?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Remove obstacles.

    -    Install furnishings, planters, or other cane-= detectable
         barriers underneath the obstacle.

5.   Do signs designating permanent rooms and spaces, such as rest
    room signs, exit signs, and room numbers, comply with the
    appropriate requirements for accessible signage?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Provide signage that has raised and brailled letters,
         complies with finish and contrast standa= rds, and is
         mounted at the correct height and locati= on.


CONTROLS (ADAAG 4.27):

1.   Are all controls that are available for use by the public
    (including electrical, mechanical, window, cabinet, game, and
    self-service controls) located at an accessible height?

    NOTE:  Reach ranges:  The maximum height for a side reach is
    54 inches; for a forward reach, 48 inches.  The minimum=
    reachable height is 15 inches.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Relocate controls.

2.   Are they operable with a closed fist?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Replace controls.


SEATS, TABLES AND COUNTERS (ADAAG 4.2, 4.32):

1.   Are the aisles between chairs or tables at least 36 inches
    wide?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Rearrange chairs or tables to provide 36-inch aisles.

2.   Are the spaces for wheelchair seating distributed throughout?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Rearrange tables to allow room for wheelchairs in seating
         areas throughout the area.

    -    Remove some fixed seating.

3.   Are the tops of tables or counters between 28 and 34 inches
    high?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Lower at least a section of high tables and counters.

4.   Are knee spaces at accessible tables at least 27 inches high,
    30 inches wide, and 19 inches deep?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Replace or raise tables.


VERTICAL CIRCULATION (ADAAG 4.3):

1.   Are there ramps or elevators to all levels?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install ramps or lifts.

    -    Modify a service elevator.

    -    Relocate goods or services to an accessible area.

2.   On each level, if there are stairs between the entrance and/or
    elevator and essential public areas, is there an accessible<= br>     alternate route?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Post clear signs directing people along an accessible
         route to ramps, lifts or elevators.


STAIRS (ADAAG 4.9):

1.   Do tread have a non-slip surface?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add non-slip surface to treads.

2.   Do stairs have continuous rails on both sides, with extensions
    beyond the top and bottom stairs?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add or replace handrails.


ELEVATORS: (ADAAG 4.10):

1.   Are there both visible and verbal or audible door
    opening/closing and floor indicators (one tone =3D up, tow tones
    =3D down)?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install visible and verbal or audible signals= .

2.   Are the call buttons in the hallway no higher than 42 inches?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Lower call buttons.

    -    Provide a permanently attached reach stick.
3.   Do the controls outside and inside the cab have raised and
    braille lettering?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install raised lettering and braille next to buttons.

4.   Is there a sign on the jamb at each floor identifying the
    floor in raised and braille letters?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install tactile signs to identify floor numbe= rs, at a
         height of 60 inches from floor.

5.   Is the emergency intercom usable without voice communication?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Replace communication system.

6.   Are there braille and raised-letter instructions for the
    communication system?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add simple tactile instructions.


LIFTS (ADAAG 4.2, 4.11):

1.   Can the lift be used without assistance?  If not, is a call<= br>     button provided?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    At each stopping level, post clear instructio= ns for use
         of the lift.

    -    Provide a call button.

2.   Is there at least 30 by 48 inches of clear space for a person
    using a wheelchair to approach to reach the controls and use
    the lift?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Rearrange furnishings and equipment to clear more space.

3.   Are controls between 15 and 48 inches high (up to 54 inches if
    a side approach is possible)?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Move controls.


***PRIORITY 3:  USABILITY OF RESTROOMS***

When restrooms are open to the public, they should be accessible to
people with disabilities.  Closing a restroom that is currently
open to the public is not an allowable option.


GETTING TO THE RESTROOMS (ADAAG 4.1):

1.   If restrooms are available to the public, is at least one
    restroom (either one for each sex, or unisex) fully
    accessible?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Reconfigure restroom.

    -    Combine restrooms to create one unisex access= ible
         restroom.

2.   Are there signs at inaccessible restrooms that give directions
    to accessible ones?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install accessible signs.


DOORWAYS AND PASSAGES (ADAAG 4.2, 4.13):

1.   Is there tactile signage identifying restrooms?

    NOTE:  Mount signs on the wall, on the latch side of the door.
    Avoid using ambiguous symbols in place of text to identify     restrooms.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add accessible signage, placed to the side of the door
         (not on the door itself).

    -    If symbols are used, add supplementary verbal signage.

2.   Is the doorway at least 32 inches clear?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Install offset (swing-clear) hinges.

    -    Widen the doorway.

3.   Are doors equipped with accessible handles (operable with a
    closed fist), 48 inches high or less?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Lower handles.

    -    Replace inaccessible knobs or latches with lever or loop
         handles.

    -    Add lever extensions.

    -    Install power-assisted door openers.

4.   Can doors be opened easily (5 lbf maximum force)?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Adjust or replace closers.

    -    Install lighter doors.

    -    Install power-assisted door openers.

5.   Does entry configuration provide adequate maneuvering space
    for a person using a wheelchair?

    NOTE:  A person using a wheelchair needs 36 inches of clear
    width for forward movement, and a 5-foot diameter clear space
    or a T-shaped space to make turns.  A minimum distance of 48
    inches, clear of the door swing, is needed between the two     doors of an entry vestibule.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Rearrange furnishings such as chairs and trash cans.

    -    Remove inner door if there is a vestibule with two doors.

    -    Move or remove obstructing partitions.

6.   Is there a 36-inch-wide path to all fixtures?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Remove obstructions.


STALLS (ADAAG 4.17):

1.   Is the stall door operable with a closed fist, inside and out?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Replace inaccessible knobs with lever or loop handles.

    -    Add lever extensions.

2.   Is there a wheelchair-accessible that has an area of at least
    5 feet by 5 feet, clear of the door swing, OR is there a stall
    that is less accessible but that provides greater access than
    a typical stall (either 36 by 69 inches or 48 by 69 inches)?=

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Move or remove partitions.

    -    Reverse the door swing if it is safe to do so.

3.   In the accessible stall, are there grab bars behind and on the
    side wall nearest to the toilet?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add grab bars.

4.   Is the toilet seat 17 to 19 inches high?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Add raised set.


LAVATORIES (ADAAG 4.19, 4.24):

1.   Does one lavatory have a 30-inch-wide by 48-inch-deep clear
    space in front?

    NOTE:  A maximum of 19 inches of the required depth may be
    under the lavatory.

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Rearrange furnishings.

    -    Replace lavatory.

    -    Remove or alter cabinetry to provide space underneath.
         Make sure hot pipes are insulated.

    -    Move a partition or wall.

2.   Is the lavatory rim no higher than 34 inches?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Adjust or replace lavatory.

3.   Is there at least 29 inches from the floor to the bottom of
    the lavatory apron (excluding pipes)?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Adjust or replace lavatory.

4.   Can the faucet be operated with one closed fist?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Replace faucet handles with paddle type.

5.   Are soap and other dispensers and hand dryers 48 inches high
    or less and usable with one closed fist?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Lower dispensers.

    -    Replace with or provide additional accessible dispensers.

6.   Is the mirror mounted with the bottom edge of the reflecting
    surface 40 inches high or lower?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Lower or tilt down the mirror.

    -    Replace with larger mirror.


***PRIORITY 4:   ADDITIONAL ACCESS***

When amenities such as public telephones and drinking fountains are
provided to the general public, they should also be accessible to
people with disabilities.


DRINKING FOUNTAINS (ADAAG 4.15):

1.   Is there at least one fountain with clear floor space of at
    least 30 by 48 inches in front?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Clear more room by rearranging or removing furnishings.

2.   Is there one fountain with its spout no higher than 36 inches
    from the ground, and another with a standard height spout (or
    a single "hi-lo" fountain)?

    Yes  No

    Possible Solutions:

    -    Provide cup dispensers for fountains with spouts that are
         too high.

    -    Provide an accessible water cooler.

3.   Are controls mounted on the front or on the side near the

    Yes  No




    Yes  No