GSA Celebrates James A. Redden U.S. Courthouse Centennial

Release Date: May 2, 2016

Public invited to celebrate the past and future of this American Renaissance Revival style building.

PORTLAND, OR — GSA, along with the United States District Court for the District of Oregon, U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, and Mayor Gary Weeler, will celebrate the 100th birthday of the James A. Redden U.S. Courthouse at 310 W 6th Street in Medford, Oregon, on Thursday, May 5. The public celebration will include an open house from 1 to 2 p.m.

One hundred years ago on May 8, 1919, the building opened to rave reviews. The $110,000 brick American Renaissance Revival style building originally housed the post office, a courtroom, legal offices and chambers, and an office for the Supervisor of Crater Lake Park. Three days short of its centennial, event partners will host a celebration and open house for the building tenants and the public. This year also marks the 50th year of The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, a cornerstone of American historic preservation.

As steward of more than 400 historic buildings, the GSA is pleased to celebrate America’s architectural treasures. “It is an honor and a privilege for GSA to be guardians of important public buildings such as the James A. Redden U.S. Courthouse,” said George Northcroft, GSA Northwest/Arctic Regional Administrator. “We take our mission of providing timeless design, architecture and construction very seriously and are proud that this Courthouse has been a valuable and worthy asset to the community for more than 100 years. I’m certain, with our continued stewardship, it will continue to welcome visitors and convey the vital role government plays in our daily lives for many years to come.”

GSA builds and maintains federal properties that stand the test of time and capture the important historic elements of the time. The James A. Redden Federal Courthouse’s construction was completed in 1916 under the supervision of architect Oscar Wenderoth. A substantial extension was completed in 1940, under the supervision of architect, Louis A. Simon. In September 1996, the United States Senate enacted a bill introduced by Oregon Senator Mark Hatfield to rename the building for long-serving District Court Judge James A. Redden. The building still retains most of its original exterior and inside you can view the original courtroom.

Visit GSA’s historic preservation program for more information.

Last Reviewed 2016-05-02