Funding Approved for Two St. Louis Building Projects

March 20, 2014

The Heartland Region of GSA recently received funding for two prospectus level projects (projects exceeding $2.79 million). The approved projects are to update the Prevedel (Overland, Mo.) and Robert A. Young (downtown St. Louis) federal buildings. The projects combined will cost nearly $100 million.

Robert A. Young (RAY)

The Robert A. Young Federal Building, constructed in 1933 and located within 150 miles of two seismic zones, will receive structural modifications to increase the building’s ability to withstand forces during a seismic event. GSA has analyzed the RAY building, and has come up with a plan to stiffen the building by installing structural shear walls.

The new shear walls will start with new foundations in the basement and rise through each floor of the building, ending at the roof. The shear walls will be strategically placed to avoid historical finishes and minimize impact to existing building operations and mechanical systems.

In addition to shear walls, the seismic renovation project will isolate and secure mechanical equipment and other building systems to prevent their risk of falling during a seismic event.  When combined, both efforts will offer occupants shelter-in-place and provide safer exiting following a potential seismic event.

Construction will start in the summer of 2015 and is planned to last approximately three years. The $70.2 million project has the ability to create 100 or more construction jobs.

Prevedel Federal Building

The $27.1 million renovations for the Prevedel Federal Building will focus on its heating and air-conditioning systems. This includes separation of the building’s utilities from the former records center and renovation of 200,000 square feet of currently vacant space for the Veterans Administration.

The upgrades will help GSA meet High-Performance Green Building standards. Minimal seismic upgrades will also be implemented.

Construction will start in early 2015 and should take approximately two years.

Last Reviewed 2015-12-17