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Subchapter B—Personal Property
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Part 102-37—Donation of Surplus Personal Property

Subpart A—General Provisions

§102-37.5—What does this part cover?

This part covers the donation of surplus Federal personal property located within a State, including foreign excess personal property returned to a State for handling as surplus property. For purposes of this part, the term State includes any of the 50 States, as well as the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

§102-37.10—What is the primary governing authority for this part?

Section 549 of title 40, United States Code, gives the General Services Administration (GSA) discretionary authority to prescribe the necessary regulations for, and to execute the surplus personal property donation program.

§102-37.15—Who must comply with the provisions of this part?

You must comply with this part if you are a holding agency or a recipient of Federal surplus personal property approved by GSA for donation (e.g., a State agency for surplus property (SASP) or a public airport).

§102-37.20—How do we request a deviation from this part and who can approve it?

See §§102-2.60 through 102-2.110 of this chapter to request a deviation from the requirements of this part.

Definitions

§102-37.25—What definitions apply to this part?

The following definitions apply to this part:

“Allocation” means the process by which GSA identifies the SASP to receive surplus property on a fair and equitable basis, taking into account the condition of the property as well as the original acquisition cost of the property.

“Cannibalization” means to remove serviceable parts from one item of equipment in order to install them on another item of equipment.

“Donee” means any of the following entities that receive Federal surplus personal property through a SASP:

(1) A service educational activity (SEA).

(2) A public agency (as defined in Appendix C of this part) which uses surplus personal property to carry out or promote one or more public purposes. (Public airports are an exception and are only considered donees when they elect to receive surplus property through a SASP, but not when they elect to receive surplus property through the Federal Aviation Administration as discussed in subpart F of this part.)

(3) An eligible nonprofit tax-exempt educational or public health institution (including a provider of assistance to homeless or impoverished families or individuals).

(4) A State or local government agency, or a nonprofit organization or institution, that receives funds appropriated for a program for older individuals.

“Holding agency” means the executive agency having accountability for, and generally possession of, the property involved.

“Period of restriction” means the period of time for keeping donated property in use for the purpose for which it was donated.

“Screening” means the process of physically inspecting property or reviewing lists or reports of property to determine whether property is usable or needed for donation purposes.

“Service educational activity (SEA)” means any educational activity designated by the Secretary of Defense as being of special interest to the armed forces; e.g., maritime academies or military, naval, Air Force, or Coast Guard preparatory schools.

“Standard Form (SF) 123, Transfer Order Surplus Personal Property” means the document used to request and document the transfer of Federal surplus personal property for donation purposes.

“State” means one of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

“State agency for surplus property (SASP)” means the agency designated under State law to receive Federal surplus personal property for distribution to eligible donees within the State as provided for in 40 U.S.C. 549.

“Surplus personal property (surplus property)” means excess personal property (as defined in 102-36.40 of this chapter) not required for the needs of any Federal agency, as determined by GSA.

“Surplus release date” means the date on which Federal utilization screening of excess personal property has been completed, and the property is available for donation.

“Transferee” means a public airport receiving surplus property from a holding agency through the Federal Aviation Administration, or a SASP.

Donation Overview

§102-37.30—When does property become available for donation?

Excess personal property becomes available for donation the day following the surplus release date. This is the point at which the screening period has been completed without transfer to a Federal agency or other eligible recipient, and the GSA has determined the property to be surplus.

§102-37.35—Who handles the donation of surplus property?

(a) The SASPs handle the donation of most surplus property to eligible donees in their States in accordance with this part.

(b) The GSA handles the donation of surplus property to public airports under a program administered by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) (see subpart F of this part). The GSA may also donate to the American National Red Cross surplus property that was originally derived from or through the Red Cross (see subpart G of this part).

(c) Holding agencies may donate surplus property that they would otherwise abandon or destroy directly to public bodies in accordance with subpart H of this part.

§102-37.40—What type of surplus property is available for donation?

All surplus property (including property held by working capital funds established under 10 U.S.C. 2208 or in similar funds) is available for donation to eligible recipients, except for property in the following categories:

(a) Agricultural commodities, food, and cotton or woolen goods determined from time to time by the Secretary of Agriculture to be commodities requiring special handling with respect to price support or stabilization.

(b) Property acquired with trust funds (e.g., Social Security Trust Funds).

(c) Non-appropriated fund property.

(d) Naval vessels of the following categories: Battleships, cruisers, aircraft carriers, destroyers, and submarines.

(e) Vessels of 1500 gross tons or more which the Maritime Administration determines to be merchant vessels or capable of conversion to merchant use.

(f) Records of the Federal Government.

(g) Property that requires reimbursement upon transfer (such as abandoned or other unclaimed property that is found on premises owned or leased by the Government).

(h) Controlled substances.

(i) Items as may be specified from time to time by the GSA Office of Governmentwide Policy.

§102-37.45—How long is property available for donation screening?

Entities authorized to participate in the donation program may screen property, concurrently with Federal agencies, as soon as the property is reported as excess up until the surplus release date. The screening period is normally 21 calendar days, except as noted in 102-36.95 of this chapter.

§102-37.50—What is the general process for requesting surplus property for donation?

The process for requesting surplus property for donation varies, depending on who is making the request.

(a) Donees should submit their requests for property directly to the appropriate SASP.

(b) SASPs and public airports should submit their requests to the appropriate GSA regional office. Requests must be submitted on a Standard Form (SF) 123, Transfer Order Surplus Personal Property, or its electronic equivalent. Public airports must have FAA certify their transfer requests prior to submission to GSA for approval. GSA may ask SASPs or public airports to submit any additional information required to support and justify transfer of the property.

(c) The American National Red Cross should submit requests to GSA as described in subpart G of this part when obtaining property under the authority of 40 U.S.C. 551.

(d) Public bodies, when seeking to acquire property that is being abandoned or destroyed, should follow rules and procedures established by the donor agency (see subpart H of this part).

§102-37.55—Who pays for transportation and other costs associated with a donation?

The receiving organization (the transferee) is responsible for any packing, shipping, or transportation charges associated with the transfer of surplus property for donation. Those costs, in the case of SASPs, may be passed on to donees that receive the property.

§102-37.60—How much time does a transferee have to pick up or remove surplus property from holding agency premises?

The transferee (or the transferee’s agent) must remove property from the holding agency premises within 15 calendar days after being notified that the property is available for pickup, unless otherwise coordinated with the holding agency. If the transferee decides prior to pickup or removal that it no longer needs the property, it must notify the GSA regional office that approved the transfer request.

§102-37.65—What happens to surplus property that has been approved for transfer when the prospective transferee decides it cannot use the property and declines to pick it up?

When a prospective transferee decides it cannot use surplus property that has already been approved for transfer and declines to pick it up, the GSA regional office will advise any other SASP or public airport known to be interested in the property to submit a transfer request. If there is no transfer interest, GSA will release the property for other disposal.

§102-37.70—How should a transferee account for the receipt of a larger or smaller number of items than approved by GSA on the SF 123?

When the quantity of property received doesn’t agree with that approved by GSA on the SF 123, the transferee should handle the overage or shortage as follows:

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(a) More property is received than was approved by GSA for transfer

The known or estimated acquisition cost of the line item(s) involved is $500 or more

Submit a SF 123 for the difference to GSA (Identify the property as an overage and include the original transfer order number.)1

(b) Less property is received than was approved by GSA for transfer

The acquisition cost of the missing item(s) is $500 or more

Submit a shortage report to GSA, with a copy to the holding agency1

(c) The known or estimated acquisition cost of the property is less than $500

 

Annotate on your receiving and inventory records, a description of the property, its known or estimated acquisition cost, and the name of the holding agency.

1Submit the SF 123 or shortage report to the GSA approving office within 30 calendar days of the date of transfer.

§102-37.75—What should be included in a shortage report?

The shortage report should include:

(a) The name and address of the holding agency;

(b) All pertinent GSA and holding agency control numbers, in addition to the original transfer order number; and

(c) A description of each line item of property, the condition code, the quantity and unit of issue, and the unit and total acquisition cost.

§102-37.80—What happens to surplus property that isn’t transferred for donation?

Surplus property not transferred for donation is generally offered for sale under the provisions of Part 102-38 of this chapter. Under the appropriate circumstances (see 102-36.305 of this chapter), such property might be abandoned or destroyed.

§102-37.85—Can surplus property being offered for sale be withdrawn and approved for donation?

Yes, surplus property being offered for sale may be withdrawn for donation if approved by GSA. GSA will not approve requests for the withdrawal of property that has been advertised or listed on a sales offering if that withdrawal would be harmful to the overall outcome of the sale. GSA will only grant such requests prior to sales award, since an award is binding.

Subpart B—General Services Administration (GSA)

§102-37.90—What are GSA’s responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

The General Services Administration (GSA) is responsible for supervising and directing the disposal of surplus personal property. In addition to issuing regulatory guidance for the donation of such property, GSA:

(a) Determines when property is surplus to the needs of the Government;

(b) Allocates and transfers surplus property on a fair and equitable basis to State agencies for surplus property (SASPs) for further distribution to eligible donees;

(c) Oversees the care and handling of surplus property while it is in the custody of a SASP;

(d) Approves all transfers of surplus property to public airports, pursuant to the appropriate determinations made by the Federal Aviation Administration (see subpart F of this part);

(e) Donates to the American National Red Cross property (generally blood plasma and related medical materials) originally provided by the Red Cross to a Federal agency, but that has subsequently been determined surplus to Federal needs (see subpart G of this part);

(f) Approves, after consultation with the holding agency, foreign excess personal property to be returned to the United States for donation purposes;

(g) Coordinates and controls the level of SASP and donee screening at Federal installations;

(h) Imposes appropriate conditions on the donation of surplus property having characteristics that require special handling or use limitations (see 102-37.455); and

(i) Keeps track of and reports on Federal donation programs (see §102.37.105).

§102-37.95—How will GSA resolve competing transfer requests?

In case of requests from two or more SASPs, GSA will use the allocating criteria in 102-37.100. When competing requests are received from public airports and SASPs, GSA will transfer property fairly and equitably, based on such factors as need, proposed use, and interest of the holding agency in having the property donated to a specific public airport.

§102-37.100—What factors will GSA consider in allocating surplus property among SASPs?

GSA allocates property among the SASPs on a fair and equitable basis using the following factors:

(a) Extraordinary needs caused by disasters or emergency situations.

(b) Requests from the Department of Defense (DOD) for DOD-generated property to be allocated through a SASP for donation to a specific service educational activity.

(c) Need and usability of property, as reflected by requests from SASPs. GSA will also give special consideration to requests transmitted through the SASPs by eligible donees for specific items of property. (Requests for property to be used as is will be given preference over cannibalization requests.)

(d) States in greatest need of the type of property to be allocated where the need is evidenced by a letter of justification from the intended donee.

(e) Whether a SASP has already received similar property in the past, and how much.

(f) Past performance of a SASP in effecting timely pickup or removal of property approved for transfer and making prompt distribution of property to eligible donees.

(g) The property’s condition and its original acquisition cost.

(h) Relative neediness of each State based on the State’s population and per capita income.

Subpart C—Holding Agency

§102-37.110—What are a holding agency’s responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

Your donation responsibilities as a holding agency begin when you determine that property is to be declared excess. You must then:

(a) Let GSA know if you have a donee in mind for foreign gift items or airport property, as provided for in §§102-37.525 and 102-42.95(h) of this chapter;

(b) Cooperate with all entities authorized to participate in the donation program and their authorized representatives in locating, screening, and inspecting excess or surplus property for possible donation;

(c) Set aside or hold surplus property from further disposal upon notification of a pending transfer for donation; (If GSA does not notify you of a pending transfer within 5 calendar days following the surplus release date, you may proceed with the sale or other authorized disposal of the property.)

(d) Upon receipt of a GSA-approved transfer document, promptly ship or release property to the transferee (or the transferee’s designated agent) in accordance with pickup or shipping instructions on the transfer document;

(e) Notify the approving GSA regional office if surplus property to be picked up is not removed within 15 calendar days after you notify the transferee (or its agent) of its availability. (GSA will advise you of further disposal instructions.); and

(f) Perform and bear the cost of care and handling of surplus property pending its disposal, except as provided in 102-37.115.

§102-37.115—May a holding agency be reimbursed for costs incurred incident to a donation?

Yes, you, as a holding agency, may charge the transferee for the direct costs you incurred incident to a donation transfer, such as your packing, handling, crating, and transportation expenses. However, you may not include overhead or administrative costs in these charges.

§102-37.120—May a holding agency donate surplus property directly to eligible non-Federal recipients without going through GSA?

Generally, a holding agency may not donate surplus property directly to eligible non-Federal recipients without going through GSA, except for the situations listed in 102-37.125.

§102-37.125—What are some donations that do not require GSA’s approval?

(a) Some donations of surplus property that do not require GSA’s approval are:

(1) Donations of condemned, obsolete, or other specified material by a military department or the Coast Guard to recipients eligible under 10 U.S.C. 2572, 10 U.S.C. 7306, 10 U.S.C. 7541, 10 U.S.C. 7545, and 14 U.S.C. 641a (see Appendix A of this part for details). However, such property must first undergo excess Federal and surplus donation screening as required in this part and Part 102-36 of this chapter;

(2) Donations by holding agencies to public bodies under subpart H of this part;

(3) Donations by the Small Business Administration (SBA) to small disadvantaged businesses under 13 CFR part 124 (although collaboration and agreement between the SBA, SASPs, and GSA is encouraged); and

(4) Donations by holding agencies of law enforcement canines to their handlers under 40 U.S.C. 555.

(b) You may also donate property directly to eligible non-Federal recipients under other circumstances if you have statutory authority to do so. All such donations must be included on your annual report to GSA under 102-36.300 of this chapter.

Subpart D—State Agency for Surplus Property (SASP)

§102-37.130—What are a SASP’s responsibilities in the donation of surplus property?

As a SASP, your responsibilities in the donation of surplus property are to:

(a) Determine whether or not an entity seeking to obtain surplus property is eligible for donation as a:

(1) Public agency;

(2) Nonprofit educational or public health institution; or

(3) Program for older individuals.

(b) Distribute surplus property fairly, equitably, and promptly to eligible donees in your State based on their relative needs and resources, and ability to use the property, and as provided in your State plan of operation.

(c) Enforce compliance with the terms and conditions imposed on donated property.

§102-37.135—How does a SASP become eligible to distribute surplus property to donees?

In order to receive transfers of surplus property, a SASP must:

(a) Have a GSA-approved State plan of operation; and

(b) Provide the certifications and agreements as set forth in §§102-37.200 and 102-37.205.

State Plan of Operation

§102-37.140—What is a State plan of operation?

A State plan of operation is a document developed under State law and approved by GSA in which the State sets forth a plan for the management and administration of the SASP in the donation of property.

§102-37.145—Who is responsible for developing, certifying, and submitting the plan?

The State legislature must develop the plan. The chief executive officer of the State must submit the plan to the Administrator of General Services for acceptance and certify that the SASP is authorized to:

(a) Acquire and distribute property to eligible donees in the State;

(b) Enter into cooperative agreements; and

(c) Undertake other actions and provide other assurances as are required by 40 U.S.C. 549(e) and set forth in the plan.

§102-37.150—What must a State legislature include in the plan?

The State legislature must ensure the plan conforms to the provisions of 40 U.S.C. 549(e) and includes the information and assurances set forth in Appendix B of this part. It may also include in the plan other provisions not inconsistent with the purposes of title 40 of the United States Code and the requirements of this part.

§102-37.155—When does a plan take effect?

The plan takes effect on the date GSA notifies the chief executive officer of the State that the plan is approved.

§102-37.160—Must GSA approve amendments or modifications to the plan?

Yes, GSA must approve amendments or modifications to the plan.

§102-37.165—Do plans or major amendments require public notice?

Yes, proposed plans and major amendments to existing plans require general notice to the public for comment. A State must publish a general notice of the plan or amendment at least 60 calendar days in advance of filing the proposal with GSA and provide interested parties at least 30 calendar days to submit comments before filing the proposal.

§102-37.170—What happens if a SASP does not operate in accordance with its plan?

If a SASP does not operate in accordance with its plan, GSA may withhold allocation and transfer of surplus property until the nonconformance is corrected.

Screening and Requesting Property

§102-37.175—How does a SASP find out what property is potentially available for donation?

(a) A SASP may conduct onsite screening at various Federal facilities, contact or submit want lists to GSA, or use GSA’s or other agencies’ computerized inventory system to electronically search for property that is potentially available for donation (see 102-36.90 for information on GSAXcess).

(b) For the SASP (or a SASP’s representative) to perform onsite screening, the screener must coordinate the onsite visit and screening with the individual holding agency or organization. The screener should ascertain the identification required and any special procedures for access to the facility or location.

§102-37.180—[Reserved]
§102-37.185—[Reserved]
§102-37.190—What records must a SASP maintain on authorized screeners?

You must maintain a current record of all individuals authorized to screen for your SASP, including their names, addresses, telephone numbers, qualifications to screen, and any additional identifying information such as driver’s license or social security numbers. In the case of donee screeners, you should place such records in the donee’s eligibility file and review for currency each time a periodic review of the donee’s file is undertaken.

§102-37.195—Does a SASP have to have a donee in mind to request surplus property?

Generally yes, you should have a firm requirement or an anticipated demand for any property that you request.

§102-37.200—What certifications must a SASP make when requesting surplus property for donation?

When requesting or applying for property, you must certify that:

(a) You are the agency of the State designated under State law that has legal authority under 40 U.S.C. 549 and GSA regulations, to receive property for distribution within the State to eligible donees as defined in this part.

(b) No person with supervisory or managerial duties in your State’s donation program is debarred, suspended, ineligible, or voluntarily excluded from participating in the donation program.

(c) The property is usable and needed within the State by:

(1) A public agency for one or more public purposes.

(2) An eligible nonprofit organization or institution which is exempt from taxation under section 501 of the Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. 501), for the purpose of education or public health (including research for any such purpose).

(3) An eligible nonprofit activity for programs for older individuals.

(4) A service educational activity (SEA), for DOD-generated property only.

(d) When property is picked up by, or shipped to, your SASP, you have adequate and available funds, facilities, and personnel to provide accountability, warehousing, proper maintenance, and distribution of the property.

(e) When property is distributed by your SASP to a donee, or when delivery is made directly from a holding agency to a donee pursuant to a State distribution document, you have determined that the donee acquiring the property is eligible within the meaning of the Property Act and GSA regulations, and that the property is usable and needed by the donee.

§102-37.205—What agreements must a SASP make?

With respect to surplus property picked up by or shipped to your SASP, you must agree to the following:

(a) You will make prompt statewide distribution of such property, on a fair and equitable basis, to donees eligible to acquire property under 40 U.S.C. 549 and GSA regulations. You will distribute property only after such eligible donees have properly executed the appropriate certifications and agreements established by your SASP and/or GSA.

(b) Title to the property remains in the United States Government although you have taken possession of it. Conditional title to the property will pass to the eligible donee when the donee executes the required certifications and agreements and takes possession of the property.

(c) You will:

(1) Promptly pay the cost of care, handling, and shipping incident to taking possession of the property.

(2) During the time that title remains in the United States Government, be responsible as a bailee for the property from the time it is released to you or to the transportation agent you have designated.

(3) In the event of any loss of or damage to any or all of the property during transportation or storage at a place other than a place under your control, take the necessary action to obtain restitution (fair market value) for the Government. In the event of loss or damage due to negligence or willful misconduct on your part, repair, replace, or pay to the GSA the fair market value of any such property, or take such other action as the GSA may direct.

(d) You may retain property to perform your donation program functions, but only when authorized by GSA in accordance with the provisions of a cooperative agreement entered into with GSA.

(e) When acting under an interstate cooperative distribution agreement (see 102-37.335) as an agent and authorized representative of an adjacent State, you will:

(1) Make the certifications and agreements required in 102-37.200 and this section on behalf of the adjacent SASP.

(2) Require the donee to execute the distribution documents of the State in which the donee is located.

(3) Forward copies of the distribution documents to the corresponding SASP.

(f) You will not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, or handicap in the distribution of property, and will comply with GSA regulations on nondiscrimination as set forth in parts 101-4, subparts 101-6.2, and 101-8.3 of this title.

(g) You will not seek to hold the United States Government liable for consequential or incidental damages or the personal injuries, disabilities, or death to any person arising from the transfer, donation, use, processing, or final disposition of this property. The Government’s liability in any event is limited in scope to that provided for by the Federal Tort Claims Act (28 U.S.C. 2671, et seq.).

§102-37.210—Must a SASP make a drug-free workplace certification when requesting surplus property for donation?

No, you must certify that you will provide a drug-free workplace only as a condition for retaining surplus property for SASP use. Drug-free workplace certification requirements are found at part 105-68, subpart 105-68.6, of this title.

§102-37.215—When must a SASP make a certification regarding lobbying?

You are subject to the anti-lobbying certification and disclosure requirements in part 105-69 of this title when all of the following conditions apply:

(a) You have entered into a cooperative agreement with GSA that provides for your SASP to retain surplus property for use in performing donation functions or any other cooperative agreement.

(b) The cooperative agreement was executed after December 23, 1989.

(c) The fair market value of the property requested under the cooperative agreement is more than $100,000.

Justifying Special Transfer Requests

§102-37.220—Are there special types of surplus property that require written justification when submitting a transfer request?

Yes, a SASP must obtain written justification from the intended donee, and submit it to GSA along with the transfer request, prior to allocation of:

(a) Aircraft and vessels covered by 102-37.455;

(b) Items requested specifically for cannibalization;

(c) Foreign gifts and decorations (see Part 102-42 of this chapter);

(d) Items containing 50 parts per million or greater of polychlorinated biphenyl (see part 101-42 of this title);

(e) Firearms as described in part 101-42 of this title; and

(f) Any item on which written justification will assist GSA in making allocation to States with the greatest need.

§102-37.225—What information or documentation must a SASP provide when requesting a surplus aircraft or vessel?

(a) For each SF 123 that you submit to GSA for transfer of a surplus aircraft or vessel covered by 102-37.455 include:

(1) A letter of intent, signed and dated by the authorized representative of the proposed donee setting forth a detailed plan of utilization for the property (see 102-37.230 for information a donee has to include in the letter of intent); and

(2) A letter, signed and dated by you, confirming and certifying the applicant’s eligibility and containing an evaluation of the applicant’s ability to use the aircraft or vessel for the purpose stated in its letter of intent and any other supplemental information concerning the needs of the donee which supports making the allocation.

(b) For each SF 123 that GSA approves, you must include:

(1) Your distribution document, signed and dated by the authorized donee representative; and

(2) A conditional transfer document, signed by you and the intended donee, and containing the special terms and conditions prescribed by GSA.

§102-37.230—What must a letter of intent for obtaining surplus aircraft or vessels include?

A letter of intent for obtaining surplus aircraft or vessels must provide:

(a) A description of the aircraft or vessel requested. If the item is an aircraft, the description must include the manufacturer, date of manufacture, model, and serial number. If the item is a vessel, it must include the type, name, class, size, displacement, length, beam, draft, lift capacity, and the hull or registry number, if known;

(b) A detailed description of the donee’s program and the number and types of aircraft or vessels it currently owns;

(c) A detailed description of how the aircraft or vessel will be used, its purpose, how often and for how long. If an aircraft is requested for flight purposes, the donee must specify a source of pilot(s) and where the aircraft will be housed. If an aircraft is requested for cannibalization, the donee must provide details of the cannibalization process (time to complete the cannibalization process, how recovered parts are to be used, method of accounting for usable parts, disposition of unsalvageable parts, etc.) If a vessel is requested for waterway purposes, the donee must specify a source of pilot(s) and where the vessel will be docked. If a vessel is requested for permanent docking on water or land, the donee must provide details of the process, including the time to complete the process; and

(d) Any supplemental information (such as geographical area and population served, number of students enrolled in educational programs, etc.) supporting the donee’s need for the aircraft or vessel.

§102-37.235—What type of information must a SASP provide when requesting surplus property for cannibalization?

When a donee wants surplus property to cannibalize, include the following statement on the SF 123: “Line Item Number(s)                      requested for cannibalization.” In addition to including this statement, provide a detailed justification concerning the need for the components or accessories and an explanation of the effect removal will have on the item. GSA will approve requests for cannibalization only when it is clear from the justification that disassembly of the item for use of its component parts will provide greater potential benefit than use of the item in its existing form.

§102-37.240—How must a transfer request for surplus firearms be justified?

To justify a transfer request for surplus firearms, the requesting SASP must obtain and submit to GSA a letter of intent from the intended donee that provides:

(a) Identification of the donee applicant, including its legal name and complete address and the name, title, and telephone number of its authorized representative;

(b) The number of compensated officers with the power to apprehend and to arrest;

(c) A description of the firearm(s) requested;

(d) Details on the planned use of the firearm(s); and

(e) The number and types of donated firearms received during the previous 12 months through any other Federal program.

Custody, Care, and Safekeeping

§102-37.245—What must a SASP do to safeguard surplus property in its custody?

To safeguard surplus property in your custody, you must provide adequate protection of property in your custody, including protection against the hazards of fire, theft, vandalism, and weather.

§102-37.250—What actions must a SASP take when it learns of damage to or loss of surplus property in its custody?

If you learn that surplus property in your custody has been damaged or lost, you must always notify GSA and notify the appropriate law enforcement officials if a crime has been committed.

§102-37.255—Must a SASP insure surplus property against loss or damage?

No, you are not required to carry insurance on Federal surplus property in your custody. However, if you elect to carry insurance and the insured property is lost or damaged, you must submit a check made payable to GSA for any insurance proceeds received in excess of your actual costs of acquiring and rehabilitating the property prior to its loss, damage, or destruction.

Distribution of Property

§102-37.260—How must a SASP document the distribution of surplus property?

All SASPs must document the distribution of Federal surplus property on forms that are prenumbered, provide for donees to indicate the primary purposes for which they are acquiring property, and include the:

(a) Certifications and agreements in §§102-37.200 and 102-37.205; and

(b) Period of restriction during which the donee must use the property for the purpose for which it was acquired.

§102-37.265—May a SASP distribute surplus property to eligible donees of another State?

Yes, you may distribute surplus property to eligible donees of another State, if you and the other SASP determine that such an arrangement will be of mutual benefit to you and the donees concerned. Where such determinations are made, an interstate distribution cooperative agreement must be prepared as prescribed in 102-37.335 and submitted to the appropriate GSA regional office for approval. When acting under an interstate distribution cooperative agreement, you must:

(a) Require the donee recipient to execute the distribution documents of its home SASP; and

(b) Forward copies of executed distribution documents to the donee’s home SASP.

§102-37.270—May a SASP retain surplus property for its own use?

Yes, you can retain surplus property for use in operating the donation program, but only if you have a cooperative agreement with GSA that allows you to do so. You must obtain prior GSA approval before using any surplus property in the operation of the SASP. Make your needs known by submitting a listing of needed property to the appropriate GSA regional office for approval. GSA will review the list to ensure that it is of the type and quantity of property that is reasonably needed and useful in performing SASP operations. GSA will notify you within 30 calendar days whether you may retain the property for use in your operations. Title to any surplus property GSA approves for your retention will vest in your SASP. You must maintain separate records for such property.

Service and Handling Charges

§102-37.275—May a SASP accept personal checks and non-official payment methods in payment of service charges?

No, service charge payments must readily identify the donee institution as the payer (or the name of the parent organization when that organization pays the operational expenses of the donee). Personal checks, personal cashier checks, personal money orders, and personal credit cards are not acceptable.

§102-37.280—How may a SASP use service charge funds?

Funds accumulated from service charges may be deposited, invested, or used in accordance with State law to:

(a) Cover direct and reasonable indirect costs of operating the SASP;

(b) Purchase necessary equipment for the SASP;

(c) Maintain a reasonable working capital reserve;

(d) Rehabilitate surplus property, including the purchase of replacement parts;

(e) Acquire or improve office or distribution center facilities; or

(f) Pay for the costs of internal and external audits.

§102-37.285—May a SASP use service charge funds to support non-SASP State activities and programs?

No, except as provided in 102-37.495, you must use funds collected from service charges, or from other sources such as proceeds from sale of undistributed property or funds collected from compliance cases, solely for the operation of the SASP and the benefit of participating donees.

Disposing of Undistributed Property

§102-37.290—What must a SASP do with surplus property it cannot donate?

(a) As soon as it becomes clear that you cannot donate the surplus property, you should first determine whether or not the property is usable.

(1) If you determine that the undistributed surplus property is not usable, you should seek GSA approval to abandon or destroy the property in accordance with 102-37.320.

(2) If you determine that the undistributed surplus property is usable, you should immediately offer it to other SASPs. If other SASPs cannot use the property, you should promptly report it to GSA for redisposal (i.e., disposition through retransfer, sale, or other means).

(b) Normally, any property not donated within a 1-year period should be processed in this manner.

§102-37.295—Must GSA approve a transfer between SASPs?

Yes, the requesting SASP must submit a SF 123, Transfer Order Surplus Personal Property, to the GSA regional office in which the releasing SASP is located. GSA will approve or disapprove the request within 30 calendar days of receipt of the transfer order.

§102-37.300—What information must a SASP provide GSA when reporting unneeded usable property for disposal?

When reporting unneeded usable property that is not required for transfer to another SASP, provide GSA with the:

(a) Best possible description of each line item of property, its current condition code, quantity, unit and total acquisition cost, State serial number, demilitarization code, and any special handling conditions;

(b) Date you received each line item of property listed; and

(c) Certification of reimbursement requested under 102-37.315.

§102-37.305—May a SASP act as GSA’s agent in selling undistributed surplus property (either as usable property or scrap)?

Yes, you may act as GSA’s agent in selling undistributed surplus property (either as usable property or scrap) if an established cooperative agreement with GSA permits such an action. You must notify GSA each time you propose to conduct a sale under the cooperative agreement. You may request approval to conduct a sale when reporting the property to GSA for disposal instructions. If no formal agreement exists, you may submit such an agreement at that time for approval.

§102-37.310—What must a proposal to sell undistributed surplus property include?

(a) Your request to sell undistributed surplus property must include:

(1) The proposed sale date;

(2) A listing of the property;

(3) Location of the sale;

(4) Method of sale; and

(5) Proposed advertising to be used.

(b) If the request is approved, the GSA regional sales office will provide the necessary forms and instructions for you to use in conducting the sale.

§102-37.315—What costs may a SASP recover if undistributed surplus property is retransferred or sold?

(a) When undistributed surplus property is transferred to a Federal agency or another SASP, or disposed of by public sale, you are entitled to recoup:

(1) Direct costs you initially paid to the Federal holding agency, including but not limited to, packing, preparation for shipment, and loading. You will not be reimbursed for actions following receipt of the property, including unloading, moving, repairing, preserving, or storage.

(2) Transportation costs you incurred, but were not reimbursed by a donee, for initially moving the property from the Federal holding agency to your distribution facility or other point of receipt. You must document and certify the amount of reimbursement requested for these costs.

(b) Reimbursable arrangements should be made prior to transfer of the property. In the case of a Federal transfer, GSA will secure agreement of the Federal agency to reimburse your authorized costs, and annotate the amount of reimbursement on the transfer document. You must coordinate and make arrangements for reimbursement when property is transferred to another SASP. If you and the receiving SASP cannot agree on an appropriate reimbursement charge, GSA will determine appropriate reimbursement. The receiving SASP must annotate the reimbursement amount on the transfer document prior to its being forwarded to GSA for approval.

(c) When undistributed property is disposed of by public sale, GSA must approve the amount of sales proceeds you may receive to cover your costs. Generally, this will not exceed 50 percent of the total sales proceeds.

§102-37.320—Under what conditions may a SASP abandon or destroy undistributed surplus property?

(a) You may abandon or destroy undistributed surplus property when you have made a written finding that the property has no commercial value or the estimated cost of its continued care and handling would exceed the estimated proceeds from its sale. The abandonment or destruction finding must be sent to the appropriate GSA regional office for approval. You must include in the finding:

(1) The basis for the abandonment or destruction;

(2) A detailed description of the property, its condition, and total acquisition cost;

(3) The proposed method of destruction (burning, burying, etc.) or the abandonment location;

(4) A statement confirming that the proposed abandonment or destruction will not be detrimental or dangerous to public health or safety and will not infringe on the rights of other persons; and

(5) The signature of the SASP director requesting approval for the abandonment or destruction.

(b) GSA will notify you within 30 calendar days whether you may abandon or destroy the property. GSA will provide alternate disposition instructions if it disapproves your request for abandonment or destruction. If GSA doesn’t reply to you within 30 calendar days of notification, the property may be abandoned or destroyed.

Cooperative Agreements

§102-37.325—With whom and for what purpose(s) may a SASP enter into a cooperative agreement?

Section 549(f) of title 40, United States Code allows GSA, or Federal agencies designated by GSA, to enter into cooperative agreements with SASPs to carry out the surplus property donation program. Such agreements allow GSA, or the designated Federal agencies, to use the SASP’s property, facilities, personnel, or services or to furnish such resources to the SASP. For example:

(a) Regional GSA personal property management offices, or designated Federal agencies, may enter into a cooperative agreement to assist a SASP in distributing surplus property for donation. Assistance may include:

(1) Furnishing the SASP with available GSA or agency office space and related support such as office furniture and information technology equipment needed to screen and process property for donation.

(2) Permitting the SASP to retain items of surplus property transferred to the SASP that are needed by the SASP in performing its donation functions (see 102-37.270).

(b) Regional GSA personal property management offices may help the SASP to enter into agreements with other GSA or Federal activities for the use of Federal telecommunications service or federally-owned real property and related personal property.

(c) A SASP may enter into a cooperative agreement with GSA to conduct sales of undistributed property on behalf of GSA (see 102-37.305).

§102-37.330—Must the costs of providing support under a cooperative agreement be reimbursed by the parties receiving such support?

The parties to a cooperative agreement must decide among themselves the extent to which the costs of the services they provide must be reimbursed. Their decision should be reflected in the cooperative agreement itself. As a general rule, the Economy Act (31 U.S.C. 1535) would require a Federal agency receiving services from a SASP to reimburse the SASP for those services. Since SASPs are not Federal agencies, the Economy Act would not require them to reimburse Federal agencies for services provided by such agencies. In this situation, the Federal agencies would have to determine whether or not their own authorities would permit them to provide services to SASPs without reimbursement. If a Federal agency is reimbursed by a SASP for services provided under a cooperative agreement, it must credit that payment to the fund or appropriation that incurred the related costs.

§102-37.335—May a SASP enter into a cooperative agreement with another SASP?

Yes, with GSA’s concurrence and where authorized by State law, a SASP may enter into an agreement with an adjacent State to act as its agent and authorized representative in disposing of surplus Federal property. Interstate cooperative agreements may be considered when donees, because of their geographic proximity to the property distribution centers of the adjoining State, could be more efficiently and economically serviced by surplus property facilities in the adjacent State. You and the other SASP must agree to the payment or reimbursement of service charges by the donee and you also must agree to the requirements of 102-37.205(e).

§102-37.340—When may a SASP terminate a cooperative agreement?

You may terminate a cooperative agreement with GSA 60-calendar days after providing GSA with written notice. For other cooperative agreements with other authorized parties, you or the other party may terminate the agreement as mutually agreed. You must promptly notify GSA when such other agreements are terminated.

Audits and Reviews

§102-37.345—When must a SASP be audited?

For each year in which a SASP receives $500,000 or more a year in surplus property or other Federal assistance, it must be audited in accordance with the Single Audit Act (31 U.S.C. 7501–7507) as implemented by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-133, “Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations” (for availability see 5 CFR 1310.3). GSA’s donation program should be identified by Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance number 39.003 when completing the required schedule of Federal assistance.

§102-37.350—Does coverage under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133 exempt a SASP from other reviews of its program?

No, although SASPs are covered under the single audit process in OMB Circular A-133, from time to time the Government Accountability Office (GAO), GSA, or other authorized Federal activities may audit or review the operations of a SASP. GSA will notify the chief executive officer of the State of the reasons for a GSA audit. When requested, you must make available financial records and all other records of the SASP for inspection by representatives of GSA, GAO, or other authorized Federal activities.

§102-37.355—What obligations does a SASP have to ensure that donees meet Circular A-133 requirements?

SASPs, if they donate $500,000 or more in Federal property to a donee in a fiscal year, must ensure that the donee has an audit performed in accordance with Circular A-133. If a donee receives less than $500,000 in donated property, the SASP is not expected to assume responsibility for ensuring the donee meets audit requirements, beyond making sure the donee is aware that the requirements do exist. It is the donee’s responsibility to identify and determine the amount of Federal assistance it has received and to arrange for audit coverage.

Reports

§102-37.360—What reports must a SASP provide to GSA?

(a) Quarterly report on donations. Submit a GSA Form 3040, State Agency Monthly Donation Report of Surplus Personal Property, to the appropriate GSA regional office by the 25th day of the month following the quarter being reported. (OMB Control Number 3090-0112 has been assigned to this form.) Forms and instructions for completing the form are available from your servicing GSA office.

(b) Additional reports. Make other reports GSA may require to carry out its discretionary authority to transfer surplus personal property for donation and to report to the Congress on the status and progress of the donation program.

Liquidating a SASP

§102-37.365—What steps must a SASP take if the State decides to liquidate the agency?

Before suspending operations, a SASP must submit to GSA a liquidation plan that includes:

(a) Reasons for the liquidation;

(b) A schedule for liquidating the agency and the estimated date of termination;

(c) Method of disposing of property on hand under the requirements of this part;

(d) Method of disposing of the agency’s physical and financial assets;

(e) Retention of all available records of the SASP for a 2-year period following liquidation; and

(f) Designation of another governmental entity to serve as the agency’s successor in function until continuing obligations on property donated prior to the closing of the agency are fulfilled.

§102-37.370—Do liquidation plans require public notice?

Yes, a liquidation plan constitutes a major amendment of a SASP’s plan of operation and, as such, requires public notice.

Subpart E—Donations to Public Agencies, Service Educational Activities (SEAs), and Eligible Nonprofit Organizations

§102-37.375—How is the pronoun “you” used in this subpart?

The pronoun “you,” when used in this subpart, refers to the State agency for surplus property (SASP).

§102-37.380—What is the statutory authority for donations of surplus Federal property made under this subpart?

The following statutes provide the authority to donate surplus Federal property to different types of recipients:

(a) Section 549(d) of title 40, United States Code authorizes surplus property under the control of the Department of Defense (DOD) to be donated, through SASPs, to educational activities which are of special interest to the armed services (referred to in this Part 102-37 as service educational activities or SEAs).

(b) Section 549(c)(3) of title 40, United States Code authorizes SASPs to donate surplus property to public agencies and to nonprofit educational or public health institutions, such as:

(1) Medical institutions.

(2) Hospitals.

(3) Clinics.

(4) Health centers.

(5) Drug abuse or alcohol treatment centers.

(6) Providers of assistance to homeless individuals.

(7) Providers of assistance to impoverished families and individuals.

(8) Schools.

(9) Colleges.

(10) Universities.

(11) Schools for the mentally disabled.

(12) Schools for the physically disabled.

(13) Child care centers.

(14) Radio and television stations licensed by the Federal Communications Commission as educational radio or educational television stations.

(15) Museums attended by the public.

(16) Libraries, serving free all residents of a community, district, State or region.

(17) Historic light stations as defined under section 308(e)(2) of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470w-7(e)(2)), including a historic light station conveyed under subsection (b) of that section, notwithstanding the number of hours that the historic light station is open to the public.

(c) Section 213 of the Older Americans Act of 1965, as amended (42 U.S.C. 3020d), authorizes donations of surplus property to State or local government agencies, or nonprofit organizations or institutions, that receive Federal funding to conduct programs for older individuals.

(d) Section 549(c)(3)(C) of title 40, United States Code authorizes SASPs to donate property to veterans organizations, for purposes of providing services to veterans (as defined in section 101 of title 38). Eligible veterans organizations are those whose:

(1) Membership comprises substantially veterans; and

(2) Representatives are recognized by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs under section 5902 of title 38.

Donee Eligibility

§102-37.385—Who determines if a prospective donee applicant is eligible to receive surplus property under this subpart?

(a) For most public and nonprofit activities, the SASP determines if an applicant is eligible to receive property as a public agency, a nonprofit educational or public health institution, or for a program for older individuals. A SASP may request GSA assistance or guidance in making such determinations.

(b) For applicants that offer courses of instruction devoted to the military arts and sciences, the Defense Department will determine eligibility to receive surplus property through the SASP as a service educational activity or SEA.

§102-37.390—What basic criteria must an applicant meet before a SASP can qualify it for eligibility?

To qualify for donation program eligibility through a SASP, an applicant must:

(a) Conform to the definition of one of the categories of eligible entities listed in 102-37.380 (see Appendix C of this part for definitions);

(b) Demonstrate that it meets any approval, accreditation, or licensing requirements for operation of its program;

(c) Prove that it is a public agency or a nonprofit and tax-exempt organization under section 501 of the Internal Revenue Code;

(d) Certify that it is not debarred, suspended, or excluded from any Federal program, including procurement programs; and

(e) Operate in compliance with applicable Federal nondiscrimination statutes.

§102-37.395—How can a SASP determine whether an applicant meets any required approval, accreditation, or licensing requirements?

A SASP may accept the following documentation as evidence that an applicant has met established standards for the operation of its educational or health program:

(a) A certificate or letter from a nationally recognized accrediting agency affirming the applicant meets the agency’s standards and requirements.

(b) The applicant’s appearance on a list with other similarly approved or accredited institutions or programs when that list is published by a State, regional, or national accrediting authority.

(c) Letters from State or local authorities (such as a board of health or a board of education) stating that the applicant meets the standards prescribed for approved or accredited institutions and organizations.

(d) In the case of educational activities, letters from three accredited or State-approved institutions that students from the applicant institution have been and are being accepted.

(e) In the case of public health institutions, licensing may be accepted as evidence of approval, provided the licensing authority prescribes the medical requirements and standards for the professional and technical services of the institution.

(f) The awarding of research grants to the institution by a recognized authority such as the National Institutes of Health, the National Institute of Education, or by similar national advisory council or organization.

§102-37.400—What type of eligibility information must a SASP maintain on donees?

In general, you must maintain the records required by your State plan to document donee eligibility (see Appendix B of this part). For SEAs, you must maintain separate records that include:

(a) Documentation verifying that the activity has been designated as eligible by DOD to receive surplus DOD property.

(b) A statement designating one or more donee representative(s) to act for the SEA in acquiring property.

(c) A listing of the types of property that are needed or have been authorized by DOD for use in the SEA’s program.

§102-37.405—How often must a SASP update donee eligibility records?

You must update donee eligibility records as needed, but no less than every 3 years, to ensure that all documentation supporting the donee’s eligibility is current and accurate. Annually, you must update files for nonprofit organizations whose eligibility depends on annual appropriations, annual licensing, or annual certification. Particular care must be taken to ensure that all records relating to the authority of donee representatives to receive and receipt for property, or to screen property at Federal facilities, are current.

§102-37.410—What must a SASP do if a donee fails to maintain its eligibility status?

If you determine that a donee has failed to maintain its eligibility status, you must terminate distribution of property to that donee, recover any usable property still under Federal restriction (as outlined in 102-37.465), and take any other required compliance actions.

§102-37.415—What should a SASP do if an applicant appeals a negative eligibility determination?

If an applicant appeals a negative eligibility determination, forward complete documentation on the appeal request, including your comments and recommendations, to the applicable GSA regional office for review and coordination with GSA headquarters. GSA’s decision will be final.

Conditional Eligibility

§102-37.420—May a SASP grant conditional eligibility to applicants who would otherwise qualify as eligible donees, but have been unable to obtain approval, accreditation, or licensing because they are newly organized or their facilities are not yet constructed?

You may grant conditional eligibility to such an applicant provided it submits a statement from any required approving, accrediting, or licensing authority confirming it will be approved, accredited, or licensed. Conditional eligibility may be granted for a limited and reasonable time, not to exceed one year.

§102-37.425—May a SASP grant conditional eligibility to a not-for-profit organization whose tax-exempt status is pending?

No, under no circumstances may you grant conditional eligibility prior to receiving from the applicant a copy of a letter of determination by the Internal Revenue Service stating that the applicant is exempt from Federal taxation under section 501 of the Internal Revenue Code.

§102-37.430—What property can a SASP make available to a donee with conditional eligibility?

You may only make available surplus property that the donee can use immediately. You may not make available property that will only be used at a later date, for example, after the construction of the donee’s facility has been completed. If property is provided to the donee with conditional eligibility, and the conditional eligibility lapses (see 102-37.420), the property must be returned to the SASP for redistribution or disposal.

Terms and Conditions of Donation

§102-37.435—For what purposes may donees acquire and use surplus property?

A donee may acquire and use surplus property only for the following authorized purposes:

(a) Public purposes. A public agency that acquires surplus property through a SASP must use such property to carry out or to promote one or more public purposes for the people it serves.

(b) Educational and public health purposes, including related research. A nonprofit educational or public health institution must use surplus property for education or public health, including research for either purpose and assistance to the homeless or impoverished. While this does not preclude the use of donated surplus property for a related or subsidiary purpose incident to the institution’s overall program, the property may not be used for a nonrelated or commercial purpose.

(c) Programs for older individuals. An entity that conducts a program for older individuals must use donated surplus property to provide services that are necessary for the general welfare of older individuals, such as social services, transportation services, nutrition services, legal services, and multipurpose senior centers.

§102-37.440—May donees acquire property for exchange?

No, a donee may not acquire property with the intent to sell or trade it for other assets.

§102-37.445—What certifications must a donee make before receiving property?

Prior to a SASP releasing property to a donee, the donee must certify that:

(a) It is a public agency or a nonprofit organization meeting the requirements of the Property Act and/or regulations of GSA;

(b) It is acquiring the property for its own use and will use the property for authorized purposes;

(c) Funds are available to pay all costs and charges incident to the donation;

(d) It will comply with the nondiscrimination regulations issued under title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. 2000d-2000d-4), section 122 of title 40, United States Code, section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 794), as amended, title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 1681–1688), as amended, and section 303 of the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 (42 U.S.C. 6101–6107); and

(e) It isn’t currently debarred, suspended, declared ineligible, or otherwise excluded from receiving the property.

§102-37.450—What agreements must a donee make?

Before a SASP may release property to a donee, the donee must agree to the following conditions:

(a) The property is acquired on an “as is, where is” basis, without warranty of any kind, and it will hold the Government harmless from any or all debts, liabilities, judgments, costs, demands, suits, actions, or claims of any nature arising from or incident to the donation of the property, its use, or final disposition.

(b) It will return to the SASP, at its own expense, any donated property:

(1) That is not placed in use for the purposes for which it was donated within 1 year of donation; or

(2) Which ceases to be used for such purposes within 1 year after being placed in use.

(c) It will comply with the terms and conditions imposed by the SASP on the use of any item of property having a unit acquisition cost of $5,000 or more and any passenger motor vehicle or other donated item. (Not applicable to SEAs.)

(d) It agrees that, upon execution of the SASP distribution document, it has conditional title only to the property during the applicable period of restriction. Full title to the property will vest in the donee only after the donee has met all of the requirements of this part.

(e) It will comply with conditions imposed by GSA, if any, requiring special handling or use limitations on donated property.

(f) It will use the property for an authorized purpose during the period of restriction.

(g) It will obtain permission from the SASP before selling, trading, leasing, loaning, bailing, cannibalizing, encumbering or otherwise disposing of property during the period of restriction, or removing it permanently for use outside the State.

(h) It will report to the SASP on the use, condition, and location of donated property, and on other pertinent matters as the SASP may require from time to time.

(i) If an insured loss of the property occurs during the period of restriction, GSA or the SASP (depending on which agency has imposed the restriction) will be entitled to reimbursement out of the insurance proceeds of an amount equal to the unamortized portion of the fair market value of the damaged or destroyed item.

Special Handling or Use Conditions

§102-37.455—On what categories of surplus property has GSA imposed special handling conditions or use limitations?

GSA has imposed special handling or processing requirements on the property discussed in this section. GSA may, on a case-by-case basis, prescribe additional restrictions for handling or using these items or prescribe special processing requirements on items in addition to those listed in this section.

(a) Aircraft and vessels. The requirements of this section apply to the donation of any fixed- or rotary-wing aircraft and donable vessels that are 50 feet or more in length, having a unit acquisition cost of $5,000 or more, regardless of the purpose for which donated. Such aircraft or vessels may be donated to public agencies and eligible nonprofit activities provided the aircraft or vessel is not classified for reasons of national security and any lethal characteristics are removed. The following table provides locations of other policies and procedures governing aircraft and vessels:

For���

See���

(1) Policies and procedures governing the donation of aircraft parts.

Part 102-33, subpart D , of this chapter.

(2) Documentation needed by GSA to process requests for aircraft or vessels.

102-37.225.

(3) Special terms, conditions, and restrictions imposed on aircraft and vessels.

102-37.460.

(4) Guidelines on preparing letters of intent for aircraft or vessels.

102-37.230.

(b) Alcohol.

(1) When tax-free or specially denatured alcohol is requested for donation, the donee must have a special permit issued by the Assistant Regional Commissioner of the appropriate regional office, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Department of Justice, in order to acquire the property. Include the ATF use-permit number on the SF 123, Transfer Order Surplus Personal Property.

(2) You may not store tax-free or specially denatured alcohol in SASP facilities. You must make arrangements for this property to be shipped or transported directly from the holding agency to the designated donee.

(c) Hazardous materials, firearms, and property with unsafe or dangerous characteristics. For hazardous materials, firearms, and property with unsafe or dangerous characteristics, see part 101-42 of this title.

(d) Franked and penalty mail envelopes and official letterhead. Franked and penalty mail envelopes and official letterhead may not be donated without the SASP certifying that all Federal Government markings will be obliterated before use.

§102-37.460—What special terms and conditions apply to the donation of aircraft and vessels?

The following special terms and conditions apply to the donation of aircraft and vessels:

(a) There must be a period of restriction which will expire after the aircraft or vessel has been used for the purpose stated in the letter of intent (see 102-37.230) for a period of 5 years, except that the period of restriction for a combat-configured aircraft is in perpetuity.

(b) The donee of an aircraft must apply to the FAA for registration of an aircraft intended for flight use within 30 calendar days of receipt of the aircraft. The donee of a vessel must, within 30 calendar days of receipt of the vessel, apply for documentation of the vessel under applicable Federal, State, and local laws and must record each document with the U.S. Coast Guard at the port of documentation. The donee’s application for registration or documentation must include a fully executed copy of the conditional transfer document and a copy of its letter of intent. The donee must provide the SASP and GSA with a copy of the FAA registration (and a copy of its FAA Standard Airworthiness Certificate if the aircraft is to be flown as a civil aircraft) or Coast Guard documentation.

(c) The aircraft or vessel must be used solely in accordance with the executed conditional transfer document and the plan of utilization set forth in the donee’s letter of intent, unless the donee has amended the letter, and it has been approved in writing by the SASP and GSA and a copy of the amendment recorded with FAA or the U.S. Coast Guard, as applicable.

(d) In the event any of the terms and conditions imposed by the conditional transfer document are breached, title may revert to the Government. GSA may require the donee to return the aircraft or vessel or pay for any unauthorized disposal, transaction, or use.

(e) If, during the period of restriction, the aircraft or vessel is no longer needed by the donee, the donee must promptly notify the SASP and request disposal instructions. A SASP may not issue disposal instructions without the prior written concurrence of GSA.

(f) Military aircraft previously used for ground instruction and/or static display (Category B aircraft, as designated by DOD) or that are combat-configured (Category C aircraft) may not be donated for flight purposes.

(g) For all aircraft donated for nonflight use, the donee must, within 30 calendar days of receipt of the aircraft, turn over to the SASP the remaining aircraft historical records (except the records of the major components/life limited parts; e.g., engines, transmissions, rotor blades, etc., necessary to substantiate their reuse). The SASP in turn must transmit the records to GSA for forwarding to the FAA.

Release of Restrictions

§102-37.465—May a SASP modify or release any of the terms and conditions of donation?

You may alter or grant releases from State-imposed restrictions, provided your State plan of operation sets forth the standards by which such actions will be taken. You may not grant releases from, or amendments or corrections to:

(a) The terms and conditions you are required by the Property Act to impose on the use of passenger motor vehicles and any item of property having a unit acquisition cost of $5,000 or more.

(b) Any special handling condition or use limitation imposed by GSA, except with the prior written approval of GSA.

(c) The statutory requirement that usable property be returned by the donee to the SASP if the property has not been placed in use for the purposes for which it was donated within 1 year of donation or ceases to be used by the donee for those purposes within 1 year of being placed in use, except that:

(1) You may grant authority to the donee to cannibalize property items subject to this requirement when you determine that such action will result in increased use of the property and that the proposed action meets the standards prescribed in your plan of operation.

(2) You may, with the written concurrence of GSA, grant donees:

(i) A time extension to place property into use if the delay in putting the property into use was beyond the control and without the fault or negligence of the donee.

(ii) Authority to trade in one donated item for one like item having similar use potential.

§102-37.470—At what point may restrictions be released on property that has been authorized for cannibalization?

Property authorized for cannibalization must remain under the period of restriction imposed by the transfer/distribution document until the proposed cannibalization is completed. Components resulting from the cannibalization, which have a unit acquisition cost of $5,000 or more, must remain under the restrictions imposed by the transfer/distribution document. Components with a unit acquisition cost of less than $5,000 may be released upon cannibalization from the additional restrictions imposed by the State. However, these components must continue to be used or be otherwise disposed of in accordance with this part.

§102-37.475—What are the requirements for releasing restrictions on property being considered for exchange?

GSA must consent to the exchange of donated property under Federal restrictions or special handling conditions. The donee must have used the donated item for its acquired purpose for a minimum of 6 months prior to being considered for exchange, and it must be demonstrated that the exchange will result in increased utilization value to the donee. As a condition of approval of the exchange, the item being exchanged must have remained in compliance with the terms and conditions of the donation. Otherwise, 102-37.485 applies. The item acquired by the donee must be:

(a) Made subject to the period of restriction remaining on the item exchanged; and

(b) Of equal or greater value than the item exchanged.

Compliance and Utilization

§102-37.480—What must a SASP do to ensure that property is used for the purpose(s) for which it was donated?

You must conduct utilization reviews, as provided in your plan of operation, to ensure that donees are using surplus property during the period of restriction for the purposes for which it was donated. You must fully document your efforts and report all instances of noncompliance (misuse or mishandling of property) to GSA.

§102-37.485—What actions must a SASP take if a review or other information indicates noncompliance with donation terms and conditions?

If a review or other information indicates noncompliance with donation terms and conditions, you must:

(a) Promptly investigate any suspected failure to comply with the conditions of donated property;

(b) Notify GSA immediately where there is evidence or allegation of fraud, wrongdoing by a screener, or nonuse, misuse, or unauthorized disposal or destruction of donated property;

(c) Temporarily defer any further donations of property to any donee to be investigated for noncompliance allegations until such time as the investigation has been completed and:

(1) A determination made that the allegations are unfounded and the deferment is removed.

(2) The allegations are substantiated and the donee is proposed for suspension or debarment; and

(d) Take steps to correct the noncompliance or otherwise enforce the conditions imposed on use of the property if a donee is found to be in noncompliance. Enforcement of compliance may involve:

(1) Ensuring the property is used by the present donee for the purpose for which it was donated.

(2) Recovering the property from the donee for:

(i) Redistribution to another donee within the State;

(ii) Transfer through GSA to another SASP; or

(iii) Transfer through GSA to a Federal agency.

(3) Recovering fair market value or the proceeds of disposal in cases of unauthorized disposal or destruction.

(4) Recovering fair rental value for property in cases where the property has been loaned or leased to an ineligible user or used for an unauthorized purpose.

(5) Disposing of by public sale property no longer suitable, usable, or necessary for donation.

§102-37.490—When must a SASP coordinate with GSA on compliance actions?

You must coordinate with GSA before selling or demanding payment of the fair market or fair rental value of donated property that is:

(a) Subject to any special handling condition or use limitation imposed by GSA (see 102-37.455); or

(b) Not properly used within 1 year of donation or which ceases to be properly used within 1 year of being placed in use.

§102-37.495—How must a SASP handle funds derived from compliance actions?

You must handle funds derived from compliance actions as follows:

(a) Enforcement of Federal restrictions. You must promptly remit to GSA any funds derived from the enforcement of compliance involving a violation of any Federal restriction, for deposit in the Treasury of the United States. You must also submit any supporting documentation indicating the source of the funds and essential background information.

(b) Enforcement of State restrictions. You may retain any funds derived from a compliance action involving violation of any State-imposed restriction and use such funds as provided in your State plan of operation.

Returns and Reimbursement

§102-37.500—May a donee receive reimbursement for its donation expenses when unneeded property is returned to the SASP?

When a donee returns unneeded property to a SASP, the donee may be reimbursed for all or part of the initial cost of any repairs required to make the property usable if:

(a) The property is transferred to a Federal agency or sold for the benefit of the U.S. Government;

(b) No breach of the terms and conditions of donation has occurred; and

(c) GSA authorizes the reimbursement.

§102-37.505—How does a donee apply for and receive reimbursement for unneeded property returned to a SASP?

If the donee has incurred repair expenses for property it is returning to a SASP and wishes to be reimbursed for them, it will inform the SASP of this. The SASP will recommend for GSA approval a reimbursement amount, taking into consideration the benefit the donee has received from the use of the property and making appropriate deductions for that use.

(a) If this property is subsequently transferred to a Federal agency, the receiving agency will be required to reimburse the donee as a condition of the transfer.

(b) If the property is sold, the donee will be reimbursed from the sales proceeds.

Special Provisions Pertaining to SEAs

§102-37.510—Are there special requirements for donating property to SEAs?

Yes, only DOD-generated property may be donated to SEAs. When donating DOD property to an eligible SEA, SASPs must observe any restrictions the sponsoring Military Service may have imposed on the types of property the SEA may receive.

§102-37.515—Do SEAs have a priority over other SASP donees for DOD property?

Yes, SEAs have a priority over other SASP donees for DOD property, but only if DOD requests GSA to allocate surplus DOD property through a SASP for donation to a specific SEA. In such cases, DOD would be expected to clearly identify the items in question and briefly justify the request.

Subpart F—Donations to Public Airports

§102-37.520—What is the authority for public airport donations?

The authority for public airport donations is 49 U.S.C. 47151. 49 U.S.C. 47151 authorizes executive agencies to give priority consideration to requests from a public airport (as defined in 49 U.S.C. 47102) for the donation of surplus property if the Department of Transportation (DOT) considers the property appropriate for airport purposes and GSA approves the donation.

§102-37.525—What should a holding agency do if it wants a public airport to receive priority consideration for excess personal property it has reported to GSA?

A holding agency interested in giving priority consideration to a public airport should annotate its reporting document to make GSA aware of this interest. In an addendum to the document, include the name of the requesting airport, specific property requested, and a brief description of how the airport intends to use the property.

§102-37.530—What are FAA’s responsibilities in the donation of surplus property to public airports?

In the donation of surplus property to public airports, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), acting under delegation from the DOT, is responsible for:

(a) Determining the property requirements of any State, political subdivision of a State, or tax-supported organization for public airport use;

(b) Setting eligibility requirements for public airports and making determinations of eligibility;

(c) Certifying that property listed on a transfer request is desirable or necessary for public airport use;

(d) Advising GSA of FAA officials authorized to certify transfer requests and notifying GSA of any changes in signatory authority;

(e) Determining and enforcing compliance with the terms and conditions under which surplus personal property is transferred for public airport use; and

(f) Authorizing public airports to visit holding agencies for the purpose of screening and selecting property for transfer. This responsibility includes:

(1) Issuing a screening pass or letter of authorization to only those persons who are qualified to screen.

(2) Maintaining a current record (to include names, addresses, and telephone numbers, and additional identifying information such as driver’s license or social security numbers) of screeners operating under FAA authority and making such records available to GSA upon request.

(3) Recovering any expired or invalid screener authorizations.

§102-37.535—What information must FAA provide to GSA on its administration of the public airport donation program?

So that GSA has information on which to base its discretionary authority to approve the donation of surplus personal property, FAA must:

(a) Provide copies of internal instructions that outline the scope of FAA’s oversight program for enforcing compliance with the terms and conditions of transfer; and

(b) Report any compliance actions involving donations to public airports.

Subpart G—Donations to the American National Red Cross

§102-37.540—What is the authority for donations to the American National Red Cross?

Section 551 of title 40, United States Code authorizes GSA to donate to the Red Cross, for charitable use, such property as was originally derived from or through the Red Cross.

§102-37.545—What type of property may the American National Red Cross receive?

The Red Cross may receive surplus gamma globulin, dried plasma, albumin, antihemophilic globulin, fibrin foam, surgical dressings, or other products or materials it processed, produced, or donated to a Federal agency.

§102-37.550—What steps must the American National Red Cross take to acquire surplus property?

Upon receipt of information from GSA regarding the availability of surplus property for donation, the Red Cross will:

(a) Have 21 calendar days to inspect the property or request it without inspection; and

(b) Be responsible for picking up property donated to it or arranging and paying for its shipment.

§102-37.555—What happens to property the American National Red Cross does not request?

Property the Red Cross declines to request will be offered to SASPs for distribution to eligible donees. If such property is transferred, GSA will require the SASP to ensure that all Red Cross labels or other Red Cross identifications are obliterated or removed from the property before it is used.

Subpart H—Donations to Public Bodies in Lieu of Abandonment/Destruction

§102-37.560—What is a public body?

A public body is any department, agency, special purpose district, or other instrumentality of a State or local government; any Indian tribe; or any agency of the Federal Government.

§102-37.565—What is the authority for donations to public bodies?

Section 527 of title 40, United States Code authorizes the abandonment, destruction, or donation to public bodies of property which has no commercial value or for which the estimated cost of continued care and handling would exceed the estimated proceeds from its sale.

§102-37.570—What type of property may a holding agency donate under this subpart?

Only that property a holding agency has made a written determination to abandon or destroy (see process in Part 102-36 of this chapter) may be donated under this subpart. A holding agency may not donate property that requires destruction for health, safety, or security reasons. When disposing of hazardous materials and other dangerous property, a holding agency must comply with all applicable laws and regulations and any special disposal requirements in part 101-42 of this title.

§102-37.575—Is there a special form for holding agencies to process donations?

There is no special form for holding agencies to process donations. A holding agency may use any document that meets its agency’s needs for maintaining an audit trail of the transaction.

§102-37.580—Who is responsible for costs associated with the donation?

The recipient public body is responsible for paying the disposal costs incident to the donation, such as packing, preparation for shipment, demilitarization (as defined in 102-36.40 of this chapter), loading, and transportation to its site.

Subpart I—Transfer of Vehicle Title to a Donee

§102-37.585—In transferring donated surplus vehicles, what is the responsibility of the holding agency?

(a) The holding agency is responsible for preparing Standard Form 97, The United States Government Certificate to Obtain Title to a Vehicle (SF 97) upon notification by GSA that a donee has been identified. The SF 97 may be prepared by GSA if mutually agreed upon by the holding agency and GSA. The holding agency is designated as the “transferor”.

(b) If the holding agency authorizes or requires any other entity, including a contractor or grantee, to complete this SF 97, the holding agency must first ensure compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act.

(c) The SF 97 is a serially numbered, controlled form, stock number 7540-00-634-4047, which can be obtained by executive agencies from GSA Global Supply or online at www.gsaglobalsupply.gsa.gov. Proper precautions shall be exercised by the agency to prevent blank copies of the SF 97 from being obtained by unauthorized persons.

§102-37.590—In transferring donated surplus vehicles, what is the responsibility of the SASP?

The SASP is responsible for facilitating the transfer of the surplus vehicle to the donee in accordance with this part. The SASP should not sign the SF 97 as "transferee" unless the SASP is the donee.

§102-37.595—When transferring donated surplus vehicles, what is the responsibility of the donee?

The donee is responsible for processing the SF 97 in accordance with state licensing and titling authorities. The donee signs the SF 97 as “transferee” upon receipt of the surplus motor vehicle. The donee is responsible for notifying the SASP if a SF 97 is not provided by the Government.

§102-37.600—When does title to a surplus donated vehicle change hands?

Title to the vehicle rests with the holding agency until the SF 97 is signed by the donee upon receipt of the surplus motor vehicle. (If applicable under the terms of the donation, the title will be conditional until the end of the period of restriction).

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Subchapter B -- Personal Property, FMR