Repairing Pocket Door Hardware Including Tracks And Stops

Procedure code:
821006S
Source:
Hspg Prepared For Nps - Sero
Division:
Doors and Windows
Section:
Wood Doors
Last Modified:
06/28/2017

PART 1---GENERAL

1.01 SUMMARY

  1. This procedure includes guidance on repairing pocket door hardware with salvage or modern assemblies. Work may include replacing a missing or severely damaged floor track in a pocket door. It may also include repairing double pocket doors that roll out beyond the center point. This is usually caused by either a missing metal stop piece or building settlement.
    NOTE: IF TOP HUNG DOOR HARDWARE MUST BE REPLACED, PORTIONS OF ADJACENT WALLS MAY HAVE TO BE DEMOLISHED.
  2. Other pocket door repair procedures include the following:
    1. For guidance on unsticking a pocket door, repairing balkiness or binding, see 08210-04-R.
    2. For guidance on repairing out of plumb pocket doors, see 08210-05-R.
  3. See 01100-07-S for general project guidelines to be reviewed along with this procedure. These guidelines cover the following sections:
    1. Safety Precautions
    2. Historic Structures Precautions
    3. Submittals
    4. Quality Assurance
    5.  Delivery, Storage and Handling
    6. Project/Site Conditions
    7. Sequencing and Scheduling
    8. General Protection (Surface and Surrounding) These guidelines should be reviewed before performing this procedure and should be followed, when applicable, along with recommendations from the Regional Historic Preservation Officer (RHPO).

1.02 DEFINITIONS

  1.  Top-hung pocket doors - are unique because of their hardware.
    1.  There are two types of hanging hardware for pocket doors:
      1. Single roller type: Has one roller (front and back) and makes use of one metal track.
      2.  Side by side roller type: Has two rollers (front and back) that move along on matching wood tracks on either side of the roller assembly.
    2. Unlike pocket doors with a bottom track, top hung doors have a retractable metal or wood finger mounted at rear edge of door called a rear stop. This stop must be released for door to clear pocket for repair.

1.03 SYSTEM DESCRIPTION

  1.  A pocket door assembly in good working condition is free from decay and structurally sound. It is effortlessly smooth sliding and properly aligned. The pocket doors stop precisely when closed and are easily retrieved from pocket. The door latches crisply and should not rattle between latch and stops when closed.

PART 2---PRODUCTS

2.01 MANUFACTURES

  1.  -Stanley Hardware Co. www.stanleyhardware.com

-Stanley Commercial Hardware www.stanleycommercialhardware.com

-Lee Valley Co. http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/WhatsNew.aspx?ap=1

-Hafele http://www.hafele.com/us/products/sliding-folding-french-door-pocket-door-hardware-barn-door-hardware.asp

-Johnson Hardware http://www.johnsonhardware.com/sdindex.htm

2.02 Products

E. Aerosol lubricant with plastic spray nozzle such as WD40 http://wd40.com/, or Elmer's Slide-All Dry Spray Lubricant http://www.elmers.com/product/detail/E450, or an RHPO approved equal.

2.03 MATERIALS

  1. New or salvage hardware
  2. Replacement plaster and lath
  3.  Mild steel flat stock and rod
  4. Screws
  5. Materials for plaster and lath replacement
  6. Metal mending angle
  7. Metal pipe and plate

2.04 EQUIPMENT

  1. Carpenter's tools to remove door casing, jamb, and stop
  2.  Tools to remove and replace plaster
  3. Manufacturer specified tools for installing new hardware
  4. Drill capable of making hole through metal
  5.  Tack welding equipment
  6. Screwdriver
  7.  Tools for removing base board
  8. Hacksaw

PART 3---EXECUTION

3.01 PREPARATION

  1. Protection: Mask or cover adjacent surfaces and permanent equipment during repair and maintenance. Coverings must be adhered without adhesive tape or nails. DO NOT USE impervious sheeting that produces condensation.

3.02 ERECTION, INSTALLATION, APPLICATION

  1. Replacement Using Salvage Hardware:
    1.  Remove a 4-1/2" to 6" wide swath of plaster and lath on one side of pocket.
    2. Repair hardware or replace with similar salvage hardware. Warped wood tracks can be easily replicated.
  2. Replacement Using New Hardware:
    NOTE: MODERN HARDWARE USES BALL BEARINGS RATHER THAN ROLLERS. MORE PLASTER MAY HAVE TO BE REMOVED FOR REPLACEMENT IF MODERN HARDWARE IS USED FOR REPAIRS.
    1. Install new blocking between door framing to provide surface for attaching hardware. Follow manufacturer's instructions for installing hardware and adjusting door heights.
    2. Screw in new track assembly overhead with rollers popped in place.
    3. Screw new flanges to top of doors.
    4.  Slip door and flanges in place and adjust door height.
      NOTE: FLOOR TRACK INCLUDED WITH NEW HARDWARE IS USUALLY NOT NEEDED IN THIS TYPE OF APPLICATION UNLESS A FLOOR TRACK ALREADY EXISTS.
    5. Replace plaster and lath as required (see 009210-03-R for guidance).
  3.  For Damaged or Deteriorated Track:
    NOTE: REPLACEMENT TRACK MUST FIT SIZE OF ROLLERS MORTISED IN BOTTOM OF DOOR.
    1.  Purchase and install new track and matching rollers - or use salvage materials.
    2.  If prefabricated replacement floor track is unavailable, replacement track can be produced with metal stock.
      1.  Drill holes down center of mild steel flat stock at 6" o.c.
      2.  Tack weld a steel rod through the holes that matches the diameter of rollers.
      3. Drill countersunk screw holes, into flat stock, at 6" o.c., staggered on either side of rod.
      4.  Adhere new track to floor.
        NOTE: WALL SURFACE DOES NOT NEED TO BE COMPLETELY REMOVED. CLEARANCE INSIDE POCKET ENOUGH FOR USE OF A SCREWDRIVER IS ALL THAT IS NEEDED.
        1.  To access track inside pocket, remove baseboard on less conspicuous side of pocket.
        2.  Remove wall surface by cutting a `V' in plaster with utility knife or chisel. Top of 'V' should be about 8" above finished floor.
        3. Carefully remove plaster inside 'V' and remove lath.
  4. For a Missing Metal Stop:
    1.  If doors fit together like a tongue and groove joint, cut a metal stop from a metal mending angle.
    2. Cut one leg of the angle so that it will hang down from the top guide to just meet the top of the doors.
    3. Mortise the top piece of the angle into the top guide.
    4.  If doors have rounded edges, make a stop out of two halves of a piece of properly sized pipe welded to a metal plate; screw metal plate into a mortise cut into the top guide.
  5. For Doors that Run Below the Level of the Stop Guides:
    CAUTION: TAKE CARE, AS DOOR COULD FALL OUT OF POCKET.
    1.  Increase the depth of the molding by providing additional material.
      -OR-
      Replace entire stop molding.
      NOTE: REGIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICER AND/OR HISTORICAL ARCHITECT MUST BE CONSULTED FOR MOLDING REPLACEMENT CHOICE.

END OF SECTION

Last Reviewed 2017-06-28