Bruce R. Thompson US Courthouse and Federal Building

Bruce R. Thompson Courthouse and Federal Building400 Virginia Street
Reno, NV 89501

View map [a nongovernment website]

Completed in 1996, the Reno landmark features Sierra white granite used for the facade on the ground level. The upper floors are cast concrete colored to simulate the granite. Bruce R. Thomson was a federal judge born in Nevada.

Building Information

Property Manager: Dean Mansfield

Public Hours: 7:30 a.m.– 5 p.m. Monday through Friday (except federal holidays)

For more building information or service calls, see contact information at top right (or by scrolling down on mobile devices). For other federal government information, call 800-FED-INFO.

Parking and Public Transportation

There is no visitor parking available in the building for the general public. Metered street parking is nearby. Commercial parking lots are within walking distance to the building. Public transportation is available via RTC [a nongovernment website].

Public Access

All public visitors are required to pass through electronic security equipment. ADA access is available at the front entrance to the building.

Key Tenants

Major tenants are the U.S. District Court, U.S. Probation, U.S. Pretrial Services, and U.S. Marshals Service. In the latest (2016) Tenant Satisfaction Survey, 100% rated the federal building and GSA services four or five on a five-point scale.

Additional information for tenants >

Building Services

Vending machines accessible to the public whenever the building is open are located on the first floor in the mail room at the back of the lobby.

Public Art

Perforated Object was inspired by an artifact discovered in 1936 in a excavation headed by anthropologist and archaeologist Robert F. Heizer, the artist's father. The original artifact unearthed in the Humboldt Cave nearly 100 miles southeast of Reno was carved from the horn of a bighorn sheep and "perforated" by 90 holes drilled through it. Created more than 1,500 years ago and left with the belongings of a Shoshone shaman, its purpose remains unknown. This modern interpretation of the original object is constructed of bridge building steel and is approximately 450 times larger in size. Michael Heizer, the artist, grew up visiting archaeological sites around the world.

Awards

Building Owners and Managers Association named it The Outstanding Building of the Year® (TOBY) – State Award, Federal Building Category – in 2011.

Last Reviewed 2016-10-28