Explore Business Models

The following options are the most common ways small businesses become federal marketplace vendors.

Schedules
Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity Contracts (IDIQs)
Governmentwide Acquisition Contracts (GWACs)
Non-Schedules Based Contracts
Subcontracting and Other Partnerships
Set-Asides and Other Special Interest Groups

Schedules

The Schedules Program is the most widely used federal procurement program. Over 12 million commercial items are available under various Schedules.

If you choose to sell via Schedules, you must be registered in the System for Award Management (SAM). To qualify as a Schedules contractor, your company must be in business a minimum of 2 years and show an annual revenue of at least $25,000.

Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity Contracts (IDIQs)

IDIQs are used when GSA can’t determine, above a specified minimum, the precise quantities of products or services that the government will require during the contract period (which often spans 5+ years). IDIQs standardize the ordering process for the business and provide flexibility for the agency.

Government-Wide Acquisition Contracts (GWACs)

GWACs are pre-competed, multiple-award, indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contracts that agencies can use to buy total IT solutions, including both products and services.A GWAC contract requires a vendor to be registered in the System for Acquisition Management (SAM) but does not have a minimum "years in business" experience or an annual revenue minimum to pursue a contract.

Non-Schedules Based Contracts

These contracts are often for building design and construction, architecture and engineering acquisitions, and some professional service engagements. These procurements require a response to the RFP or RFQ; be sure to include Form 1442 with your submission.

Subcontracting and Other Partnerships

Subcontracting and other partnerships involves working with other contractors in order to test the waters of federal business without suffering undue risk.

Set-Asides and Special Interest Groups

Qualified small businesses that meet various socioeconomic criteria are eligible to compete for additional set-aside opportunities after obtaining certification from the SBA.

Last Reviewed: 2019-10-25