Photo of  (left to right) GSA Regional Administrator Sylvia Hernandez, BRIT Senior VP/Director of Education Pat Harrison, Brit Project Manager Rebecca Grimmer, BRIT Scientist Heather Bass and GSA Sustainability Specialist Kelly Longfellow.

GSA Partners with Botanical Research Institute of Texas to study sustainable landscapes

In photo: (left to right) GSA Regional Administrator Sylvia Hernandez, BRIT Senior VP/Director of Education Pat Harrison, Brit Project Manager Rebecca Grimmer, BRIT Scientist Heather Bass and GSA Sustainability Specialist Kelly Longfellow.

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Communication and coordination among federal agencies is essential in today’s ever changing world. That’s why Federal Executive Boards (FEB) are more relevant than ever and why I am honored to serve as the 2016 FEB’s Chairperson for the Dallas Fort Worth FEB. FEBs provide closer coordination across agency lines outside Washington, D.C., and are essential for strategic partnering among federal agencies. As chairperson, not only do I get to serve the federal community as a whole, I also have the opportunity to better serve our customer agencies by developing stronger relationships and strategies at the regional level. This fits in perfectly with one of GSA’s key priorities to serve our partners.

I recently attended the FEB’s Annual Strategic and Operational Meeting in Washington, D.C. with chairpersons from boards across the country. GSA Administrator Denise Turner Roth spoke to the group about GSA’s important and critical roles in cybersecurity and presidential transition, and GSA’s Technology Transformation Service as the third GSA service for federal agencies. The Environmental Protection Agency, Federal Emergency Management Agency, Office of Personnel Management, National Security Council and the White House were in attendance. Agenda items included FEMA’s PrepareAthon, presidential transition, Executive Order 13693 and federal cybersecurity workforce strategy.

As the DFW FEB’s chairperson, I am honored to be a part of the DFW federal leadership and to be a part of something even greater – a call to service. Supporting the FEB’s three business lines – Emergency Preparedness, Workforce Development, and Intergovernmental and Interagency Collaboration and Community Outreach – help us to address the needs of our nation while also supporting local initiatives. Whether we are conducting emergency preparedness training and exercises, educating and promoting ways to be a more sustainable government and community or chairing the annual Combined Federal Campaign, the work is most gratifying.

FEBs were established by a presidential directive signed by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 to increase the effectiveness and economy of federal agencies by coordinating government activities outside of Washington, D.C. They have a long history of establishing and maintaining valuable communication links among federal agencies. Boards are located in areas with significant federal population and are comprised of local, senior level federal agency officials. There are currently 28 FEBs nationally.

Last Reviewed: 2019-07-23