Douglas

Background

This new dedicated commercial port of entry will provide Douglas, Arizona with two LPOEs and allow for the crossing of oversized mining equipment and chemicals, as well as other commercial traffic. The need for the dedicated commercial port was identified in a feasibility study that was completed in collaboration with the city of Douglas and community stakeholders.

Black and white map diagram of a land port of entry proposed plan, showing roads and buildings, with labels and scale indicated

Project Overview


The project will include the construction of primary commercial inspection booths, canopy, headhouse, administrative building, secondary vehicle inspection docks, employee parking, hazmat building, U.S. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) facility, and other support facilities.

Project Benefits


The Raul Hector Castro Port (RHC) is too small to efficiently process both commercial and noncommercial traffic flows and the heavy mining industry traffic that is processed at RHC presents traffic and safety issues for the community in Douglas. A dedicated commercial port in Douglas will strengthen supply chains by better facilitating the crossing of commercial goods, produce, and heavy mining equipment as well as act as a regional economic engine.

Raul Hector Castro

Background

The Raul Hector Castro (RHC) LPOE facilities were built between 1933 and 1993. The 1933 Main Building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The facilities at the RHC LPOE currently serve both commercial and noncommercial traffic in a facility that is undersized for U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) current mission.

Aerial view of a grouping of low buildings and surrounding pavement and parking lots and parked cars, and lines of vehicles waiting to go through a border check under a covered area
Red stone and stucco building entrance with a lamp post, and fencing with drive lanes on the left and a blue sky above

Project Overview


The proposed project includes demolition and reconstruction of the existing legacy facilities, and reconstruction and expansion of the processing and administrative facilities to align with CBP's mission. Areas include replacement of pedestrian and vehicular inspection facilities.

Project Benefits


The Raul H. Castro LPOE is a critical facility for U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (CBP) mission in southern Arizona. Today, the 4.8 acre federal facility, originally built in 1933 and expanded in 1993, is not able to fully meet U.S. Customs and Border Protection's mission requirements. In its current configuration, both inbound and outbound trucks maneuver within the same undersized commercial vehicle inspection compound, which slows traffic and poses safety hazards. Once commercial activities are transitioned to the new Douglas port, the necessary demolition and reconstruction of this legacy facility will replace the systems and buildings that are undersized and well beyond their useful life. The RHC LPOE renovation will expand the processing and administrative facilities to meet CBPs current standards, and provide a safe and efficient processing of POV and pedestrian traffic.

San Luis I

Background

Originally processing both commercial and noncommercial traffic, the port became exclusively noncommercial in 2010 when San Luis I began processing commercial traffic.

Grainy aerial photo of a group of buildings with roads and green areas around, with lines of cars in five lanes lined up to go through inspection lanes

Project Overview


The project anticipates a complete modernization that will expand vehicle and pedestrian processing lanes, and include construction of new southbound inspection facilities, a public facing building, and new operational and administrative facilities.

Project Benefits


The San Luis I LPOE is the second busiest non-commercial LPOE in Arizona. However, the port currently processes more traffic than originally designed to accommodate. Existing facilities are significantly undersized and require upgrading to meet the current mission requirements of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). All major building systems are past their useful lives. The modernization will improve efficiencies and traffic flows, increase operational security, and allow CBP to more effectively deploy the latest technology to identify high risk activity and shipments and combat drug trafficking.

Last Reviewed: 2022-02-24