Alburg Springs

Background

The Alburg Springs Land Port of Entry (LPOE) is located in a rural area just west of Lake Champlain and approximately five miles northeast of the Town of Alburg, Vermont. The LPOE is across the border from the Canada Border and Service Agency Office in Clarenceville, Quebec. Both the U.S. and Canadian ports operate 7 days a week from 8:00 am to 12:00 am.

Red brick two-level building with open gable roof, with large white-columned canopy extending out from the front door over one paved lane, with grassy areas and a two-vehicle detached garage to the left
Street-level black and white view of a gabled-roof building on the right, with a canopy over one lane in front of it, and a white garage building to the left of it, and another small building and a U.S. flag on a pole on the far left

Project Overview


The project will provide new construction to expand the existing facility with a new state-of-the-art facility.

Project Benefits


Constructed in 1937, the existing facility is significantly antiquated for today’s mission. CBP’s mission readiness, officer safety, public safety, and quality of service are impacted by the configuration and capacity of the current port. Most of the infrastructure is operating well beyond capacity. The modernization project will result in a more secure, efficient, and functional port facility to facilitate the flow of trade and commerce, while enhancing safety and security.

Beebe Plain

Background

The Beebe Plain LPOE consists of a Main Building that is a two story 3,295 GSF Georgian Revival (architectural style) masonry facility with a basement and a small 342 GSF two-bay garage both constructed in 1937. Beebe Plain LPOE is just south of Canusa Avenue, which is the only part of the Canada- United States border that runs down the middle of a street.

Low red brick building with gabled roof, chimney and canopy that extends over one lane outside of the entrance door, with yellow guards and stop signs, orange traffic cones and three white buildings on the left in the distance
Black and white photo of a brick building with a chimney and dormer roof and a canopy outside of the door over one driving lane, with a flag pole and a white building on the left

Project Overview


The proposed project will provide new construction to expand the existing facility with a new state-of-the-art facility.

Project Benefits


Constructed in 1937, the existing facility is significantly antiquated for today’s mission, impacting CBP readiness, officer safety, public safety, and quality of service. The modernization project will result in a more secure, efficient, and functional port facility to facilitate the flow of trade and commerce, while enhancing safety and security.

Highgate Springs

Background

Highgate Springs is one of the busiest Land Ports of Entry in New England. Historically, the traffic volume at this crossing has been over 475,000 privately owned vehicles and 97,000 trucks annually. Vermont’s 13 Land Ports of Entry account for more than $2.2 billion worth of goods traded between the United States and Canada each year.

Angled street-level view of a curved awning that extends from a tan brick building entrance over three paved lanes with yellow booths beside each lane, orange traffic cones and four cars lined up in one lane
Driver's view of a curved canopy that extends over two paved lanes, with a yellow booth at the left and trees along the left side, and to the right, the angled, glass entrance to a two-level, tan-brick building

Project Overview


The proposed Highgate Springs Land Port of Entry capital project will include a new facility that is better equipped to support U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s mission, and facilitate the flow of trade and commerce.

Project Benefits


The new facility is particularly needed due to the anticipated completion of Canadian Auto-Route 35 in 2025, which will connect to Interstate 89 at Highgate Springs. The new land port of entry will improve public and officer safety, as well as expedite crossing times for the traveling public and businesses.

Norton

Background

The Norton LPOE consists of a two-story 7,241 SF, gable roof, wood framed, brick clad Main building with one-story wood framed flanking wings constructed in 1933, a single story 943 SF truck facility constructed in 1961, and two additional garages that were constructed in 2003. The LPOE is sited on 0.9 acres.

A red brick and white-sided building, with a canopy extending out from the center entrance over two lanes, with two vehicles nearby and a two-lane highway to the right with a stop sign next to it
Black and white street-level view of a low white building with a canopy over three lanes in the center front entrance, with four square garage bays on either side

Project Overview


The project will provide a state-of-the-art and expanded capacity facility with a new secondary commercial inspection facility and a main building that will fully satisfy the requirements for public area, document processing, enforcement, support areas, staff services, building support, restrooms/showers, and non-commercial secondary inspection.

Project Benefits


The current facilities are significantly antiquated for today’s national security mission and do not meet CBP’s current LPOE design standards. The project will help improve traffic flow, enhance security, and facilitate trade and travel in the region.

Richford

Background

The Richford LPOE is located at 705 Province Street, which connects to Quebec Route 139 in Abercorn, Quebec. The building was group-listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2014 together with all period New England LPOEs.

Red brick gable-roofed two-story building with a canopy out front to the left covering two traffic lanes, with yellow guards and orange traffic cones and two stop signs, vehicles in a parking lot in the background, and a two-lane road to the left
Dramatic black and white street-level view of a white building with a canopy over two lanes in the center front entrance, with three garage bays on either side, and a cloudy sky above

Project Overview


The proposed project will provide new construction in addition to renovating the existing facility to provide a new state-of-the-art and expanded capacity facility.

Project Benefits


Constructed in 1934, the existing facility is significantly antiquated for today’s mission. The modernization project will result in a more secure, efficient, and functional port facility to facilitate the flow of trade and commerce, while enhancing safety and security.

Last Reviewed: 2022-02-24