Calais-Ferry Point

Background

The Ferry Point LPOE is located at 3 Customs Street, Calais Maine on 0.8 acres. just before a bridge crossing between Calais, Maine and St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada. The Ferry Point LPOE contains two buildings, a main port building and inspection garage. Both buildings are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Two level brick building with two chimneys and a blue driveway cover with two booths and yellow ground posts
Close up of red brick building facade with three rectangular windows and an oval vent above the center window, with U.S. flag in back at left

Project Overview


The project will provide new construction to expand the existing historic facility with new state-of-the-art capability and capacity. The project will construct a secondary inspection canopy, an enclosed secondary inspection, three inbound lanes, an outbound lane and outbound bypass lane.

Project Benefits


The existing facility, constructed in 1935, is significantly antiquated for today’s mission and vehicular/pedestrian throughput. CBP’s mission readiness, officer safety, public safety, and quality of service are impacted daily by the configuration and capacity of the current port. Vehicular volume regularly causes traffic on the international bridge resulting in delays and impacting the community at large. Most of the infrastructure is operating well beyond capacity.

Coburn Gore

Background

The Coburn Gore LPOE is bisected by State Route 27 (also known as Highway 27) and is the westernmost of the 24 official border crossings in Maine. The facility is located in a rural area.

White one-level building with six garage spaces, orange traffic cones and a covered drive-through, with trees in the background and green grass in front
Angled view of a white one-story building with green garage bay doors, orange traffic cones and a sign on the driveway cover that says United States Border Inspection Station - Coburn Gore, Maine

Project Overview


The project will construct a new main building and commercial inspection facility that will fully satisfy the requirements for public area, document processing, enforcement, support areas, staff services, building support, restrooms/showers, and non-commercial secondary inspection. The project includes onsite housing for CBP Officers.

Project Benefits


Constructed in 1932, the existing facility is significantly antiquated for today’s security mission. CBP’s mission readiness, officer safety, public safety, and quality of service are impacted daily by the configuration and capacity of the current port. A level of commercial traffic, which was never originally anticipated in the 1930s, lacks the required commercial inspection facilities. Most of the infrastructure is operating well beyond capacity.

Fort Fairfield

Background

Constructed in 1933, the Fort Fairfield LPOE building in Maine is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Three-part white and red brick building with a cover over two drive-through lanes, a stop sign and flags
One-to-two story three-part white and red brick building, with six vehicles parked along it, and green grass

Project Overview


The proposed project will improve line-of-sight of inbound traffic and streamline outbound traffic flow through the crossing.

Project Benefits


Constructed in 1933, the existing facility is significantly antiquated for today’s mission. CBP’s mission readiness, officer safety, public safety, and quality of service are impacted by the configuration and capacity of the current port. Most of the infrastructure is operating well beyond capacity. The proposed project would provide a newly configured canopy, expanded inspection lanes and booths, an expanded site for safe pedestrian and vehicular travel, and a new outbound inspection lane

Houlton

Background

The Houlton LPOE is located at 27 Customs Loop, Houlton, ME. It is a large-scale New England crossing and operates 24/7 at the terminus of Interstate 95 (I-95 and occupies 7.8 acres). The corresponding Canadian border station is Woodstock Station, New Brunswick, CA.

Aerial view of several low silver, white and tan buildings, with traffic check lanes, highways, parking lots, and grasses and forests around
Office interior view with curved, blond-wood desk area, white ceilings and a view out of a window bay to see a tan building and vehicles outside in the distance

Project Overview


The proposed project will repair the existing building systems and site infrastructure to eliminate critical deficiencies and bring them into compliance with the GSA P-100 Standards. Building items in need of repair include building envelopes (roofs, windows, exterior wall panels, storefront systems), elevators, mechanical systems, plumbing systems and the fire alarm. Site items in need of replacement include water service lines, the septic system and the underground fuel tanks.

Project Benefits


All major building systems and site infrastructure are operating well beyond their useful life and are in critical need for immediate reinvestment. These impacts are further compounded by the high risk of failures associated with the facility’s other primary building systems (electrical, HVAC, etc) that are also end-of-life and pose significant risk of failure. These risks jeopardize temporary port closures and can only be partially mitigated by small emergency repairs due to funding limitations.

Limestone

Background

The Limestone LPOE is located at 410 Grand Falls Road (Maine State Route 229) in Limestone,Maine. The port consists of a one-story, gabled-roof, aluminum-clad building with one-story flanking wings and a flat roof canopy. The building was group-listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2014 together with all period New England LPOEs.

One-story white building with a garage and cover over one check-through lane, next to paved road, with evergreen trees behind it
Cropped close up view of a white shingled building entrance, with cover over one driving lane, yellow posts, and signage that says United States Customs in gold, Clearance 9'-3" in blue and Do Not Enter twice in red

Project Overview


The project will provide a state-of-the-art and expanded capacity facility. Relocation of this historical asset will not be undertaken; instead, adaptive reuse will be pursued in its present location. A newly constructed Main Port Building would be sited to allow for proper vehicular queuing and circulation, along with an expanded area allowing for the incorporation of CBP’s new processing technology and security features.

Project Benefits


Constructed in 1933, the existing facility is significantly antiquated for today’s mission. CBP’s mission readiness, officer safety, public safety, and quality of service are impacted by the configuration and capacity of the current port. Most of the infrastructure is operating well beyond capacity. The proposed project will modernize and reconfigure the historic Main Port Building to accommodate the required CBP mission functions, such as document processing, enforcement, secondary inspection.

Last Reviewed: 2022-02-24